Unobserved, Free particles in the state of superposition is proof of a 4th dimension

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String Theory needs 10 dimensions to function, but most people have a problem with it because we don't have proof of extra dimensions ..well here ya go.


A free/single particle is physically created (with mass in the three dimensions we are familiar with) when a conscience being acknowledges its existence. Before then, it is in a massless state that moves in a wavelike pattern (I'm convinced it's in the form of EM waves ..or something close to it in this extra dimension)
 
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Pmb

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String Theory needs 10 dimensions to function, but most people have a problem with it because we don't have proof of extra dimensions ..well here ya go.
If you'd read about the philosophy of science you'd know what's wrong with that claim. What you just said is not mere speculation but is wrong in itself. It's also nonsense. If you knew string theory you'd know why.

If you really knew science then you'd know that its not about proof.
No physical theory has ever been, nor will ever be, proved. And it's not because we're stupid or ignorant but because its not logically possible.
I recommend watching this video so you'll understand

http://www.newenglandphysics.org/common_misconceptions/Alan_Guth_04.mp4

See: https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Why_10_dimensions
String theory

String theory is a proposed physical theory. There are several versions or types of string theory. Attempts are being made to discover which version of the theory (if any) is in agreement with observations of the physical universe. All string theories include the idea of a hyperspace of more than three spatial dimensions. The "extra" spatial dimensions are theoretically "compact" or "collapsed" dimensions. This means that they are not as extended in space as the three familiar spatial dimensions. The collapsed dimensions are too small to observe directly. It is not clear how many collapsed dimensions are required for a string theory that is in best agreement with observations of the physical universe, but mathematical constraints currently favor string theories with 10, 11, or 26 dimensions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_dimension
In string theory, a model used in theoretical physics, a compact dimension is curled up in itself and very small (usually Planck length). Anything moving along this dimension's direction would return to its starting point almost instantaneously, and the fact that the dimension is smaller than the smallest particle means that it cannot be observed by conventional means.

A free/single particle is physically created (with mass in the three dimensions we are familiar with) when a conscience being acknowledges its existence. Before then, it is in a massless state that moves in a wavelike pattern (I'm convinced it's in the form of EM waves ..or something close to it in this extra dimension)
The 10 dimensions of string theory collapsed into just three.

Why is it that so many amateurs who understand, at best, only the basics of physics. Every Tom, **** and Harry thinks he has a radically new idea that the entire physics community should learn from them?
 
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I wondered why the name "****" (a common nickname for "Richard") had been censored. Apparently physicshelpforum.com does that automatically! That's really being a little too uptight!
 
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Nov 2016
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Let's call it "evidence" then. We don't see extra dimensions ..and we don't see particles in superposition because they are apart of this extra dimension.
 
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No, no, no. We don't see particles in superposition because they are hiding behind the pink unicorns.
 
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Not according to the double slit experiment. When an object is capable and goes into a superposition state ..it becomes apart of this extra dimension.
 
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Not sure what you are referring to as an extra dimension. I think of them more as in the context of linear algebra where the dimensions are more or less independent of each other. Moving up and down is independent of moving left and right, etc.

Superposition is not, in the context of linear algebra or differential equations, generally an extra dimension. Arguably it could be the combining of two or more independent "directions" to form a new composite "direction" but not really an extra dimension in the normal sense of the word.
 
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