Tramp and Electron

Mar 2018
118
5
Xinhui Guangdong Province China
The tramp hug the electron and go to a new continent and continue the research of current. There is no wire yet there. He has to establish a coordinate system on the earth. He open his arms and the electron drop. It's said that it can be seen as single current. Because the electron is accelerating, so the single current is increasing. Will he see electromagnetic wave radiation?
 
Jun 2016
1,198
565
England
Theoretically, a single electron accelerating under gravity
will produce electromagnetic wave radiation.

However, if we look at the energy balance,
It would not take a particularly energetic photon to remove all the kinetic energy of the electron,
thereby preventing it from accelerating.
 
Mar 2018
118
5
Xinhui Guangdong Province China
...

the tramp change a method to research current . He hang the electron in front of him and fix it there and jump to it. Within one second, he is accelerating. Will he see electromagnetic wave radiation?
 
Jun 2016
1,198
565
England
May be Wrong..

Just been thinking about this, and have revised my previous ideas.
I am uncertain if my thought processes are correct,
but here they are for appraisal...

Considering gravity as a consequence of space/time geometry
The electron is travelling along a space/time geodesic (it is in free fall).

This means that while it may be accelerating in our frame of reference
(sitting on the surface of the Earth),
However in its own frame of reference, it is perfectly stationary
(it is us who are accelerating upward at 9.8 m/s/s).

Thus in order to hold an electron at a constant height above the ground,
work will have to be done.
This implies an electron will have to exchange energy with it surroundings,
in order to hold it stationary with respect to the surface of the Earth.

While it is falling under gravity, it is in energy equilibrium , so no electro-magnetic emissions.
 
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Mar 2018
118
5
Xinhui Guangdong Province China
...

The tramp is sealed off by the local dark force while no other country he can go.So he has to leave the earth and go into the cosmos.He floats in the broad and empty space. There, he set up one simplest system: one proton and one electron. He establish the coordinate system on the proton and stand with it.
Case 3: He make the electron move freely along a radial direction of the proton.
Maybe, he will see the other coil spark.(reference to the story two coils spark. In fact the situation is similiar.)...
 
Mar 2018
118
5
Xinhui Guangdong Province China
...

Case 2: He make the electron move in constant speed along a radial direction of the proton.
Case 1: He make the electron turn around the proton in circular track.
Case 1 and case 2 are totally different situations but lead to the same result, no electromagnetic wave radiation, while case 1 and case 3 are all situations of acceleration, but lead to different results. why? God's there?
And take the gravity case into consideration as case 4, a united explanation can be reached?
 
Jun 2016
1,198
565
England
I think I see where you are aiming,
and I am not entirely sure how to frame my full argument.

However for case 1 (the circular track around the proton) there will be electromagnetic radiation.

This does not contradict what went before,
An electron in an atom does not follow a circular track.
The electron and proton in an atom are in many respects not separate entities.
They together form a single wave equation within which the overall energy is balanced.
 
Mar 2018
118
5
Xinhui Guangdong Province China
...

The single wave function can be seperated into two, right?
If case 1 generates radiation, a free flying H-atom will slow down and stop ,then collapse.
If there is a way to give a united explanation for that four cases(models), I think that someone will surely interested in it. He is in America. It's said that he went there in World War Ⅱ.
 
Oct 2017
577
297
Glasgow
Case 1: He make the electron turn around the proton in circular track.
Case 2: He make the electron move in constant speed along a radial direction of the proton.
Case 3: He make the electron move freely along a radial direction of the proton.
Case 1: the electron will be attracted to the proton via the EM force and will accelerate towards it, undergoing radial acceleration. It will radiate Bremsstrahlung and its orbital radius will decrease. To continue circular motion (rather than a spiral), its energy must be topped up by a fluctuating electric field which imposes a force such that the net force maintains circular motion. However, this electric field will also affect the proton, so it's very difficult to achieve the intended motion (will need to neglect the effect of the field on the proton).

Note: this used to be the old "solar system" model of the atom, but when no radiation was observed from orbital electrons, classical thinking had to be discarded in favour of quantum mechanics.

Case 2: the electron will be attracted to the proton via the EM force and will accelerate towards it, undergoing linear acceleration. However, the problem set-up requires constant speed. To prevent it accelerating, it will need to be subjected to an external EM force from an electric field, which constantly changes it's magnitude to adjust to the magnitude of the attractive EM force (in the opposite direction to the proton). No Bremsstrahlung will be emitted, but it will encounter the proton at some point and there will be an interaction (with an interaction probability based on their kinetic energies). However, this electric field will also affect the proton, so it's very difficult to achieve the intended motion (will need to neglect the effect of the field on the proton).

Case 3: the electron will be attracted to the proton via the EM force and will accelerate towards it, undergoing radial acceleration. Bremsstrahlung will be emitted, but it will encounter the proton at some point and there will be an interaction (with an interaction probability based on their kinetic energies). No external electric field is required here.

Basically: accelerating charges emit radiation. Same is true for gravitational acceleration, but typical forces on Earth are very weak, so it might not exceed the threshold energy for momentum transfer (\(\displaystyle m\hbar\)). You certainly get x-rays from charged particles from matter around extreme environments (e.g. black holes) because the gravitational forces are much larger.
 
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Jun 2016
1,198
565
England
Eletron "orbital" model

Accelerating electrons emit radiation.
Electrons in atoms are not emitting radiation, so they are not accelerating.
So the simple electron orbital model can not be correct.

More recent Quantum Mechanics based models avoid these problems.