Question about charged circular dish-an old topic

Jun 2016
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England
Why do you claim that if the electron is "stationary" (relative to the ground)
but you are moving, you will not experience any magnetic effects due to the electron.

The ground has nothing to do with the argument.
It is the relative movement of you and the electron that give rise to the magnetism.
So you will experience magnetism in both cases.

This can be seen in the simple magnet and wire experiment.
You get exactly the same effect by moving the magnet as you get by moving the wire.
If you move both at the same rate, so they stay the same distance apart, then you will see no effect.
 
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Mar 2019
758
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Top guess 2019?

Thanks for you reply, woody.
But intuition tells me that magnetism will not occur in the latter case in my last post. Guys may do an experiment as below:
Fix a plastic ball over the ground and brush it with a piece of cloth or leather, which one is appropriate. (charge by friction) Put a compass beside the ball. Put the cloth or leather on a table nearby. Walk to ball and watch if the compass turns. A partner is wellcome too, walk to the ball in the opposite side and watch the compass.
 
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Jun 2016
1,182
549
England
I think I see what you are saying,
You have created a static electric charge on the ball,
by moving the compass relative to the ball (or the ball relative to the magnet)
you now have a moving charge relative to the compass,
a moving charge should create a magnetic field, which should be detected by the compass.
 
Mar 2019
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The ball, the compass, the cloth are relatively static. The guys are moving.
What will they see in the compass?
 
Jun 2016
1,182
549
England
Exactly the same as they would see if the ball and the cloth were not present.
 
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Mar 2019
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cosmos
I only want to spark thought about space here, I suggest that this thread close here.