Molecules

werehk

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Apr 2008
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HK
For ideal gas, molecules are having intermolecular forces, they would attract each other. How are the electrons distributed so that the repulsion between electron clouds and repulsion between nuclei can be smaller?
 

topsquark

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Apr 2008
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On the dance floor, baby!
For ideal gas, molecules are having intermolecular forces, they would attract each other. How are the electrons distributed so that the repulsion between electron clouds and repulsion between nuclei can be smaller?
I'm not sure what you are asking? There is no attraction (or repulsion) of the particles in an ideal gas. Notice that I said "particles." An ideal gas makes no distinction between any kinds of particles. So the particles could be atoms, molecules, or even Christmas trees if you like. (Rofl) It is only when we start talking about Van der Waals forces that the particles start sticking together. There are tiny forces associated with the electron clouds as well (for non-ideal gases.) In this case the electron clouds are always changing their distributions. When the electron cloud of one molecule are all on one side of the molecule it is polarized, meaning that any other molecule will be slightly attracted to another. Granted these forces are small and don't last long, but they have been proven to exist.

-Dan
 
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