Is the following a parallel or a series circuit?

Nov 2014
3
0
Imagine two copper plates 6" square with a single wire soldered to each plate. Now arrange several D-size batteries, as many as you can arrange standing up on their '-' ends, on one of the plates as it's laying flat on the table. Now set the other plate on top, so it touches all the '+' ends.

What is the effect of arranging the batteries like this? I *think* that the output of all is the same as one, but it will last a lot longer.

Thanks for your thoughts.
 

MBW

Apr 2008
668
23
Bedford, England
You are correct,
The effect of placing batteries side by side is to produce a battery pack with the same voltage output as the individual batteries, but capable of delivering more power (higher available current).

The other way of connecting batteries is end to end (in series).
This gives the same (maximum available) current as a single battery, but a higher voltage
 
Last edited:
Nov 2014
16
0
Are each battery individually serial or parallel or both?
 
Aug 2013
157
0
Under a bridge, Tampa, Florida USA
It is neither as it is not a closed circuit... if you connect the two wires to something then you will have a circuit. The batteries however are in a parallel configuration. A parallel circuit is a current divider, a series circuit is a voltage divider.
 
Last edited:
Nov 2014
3
0
Thanks for your reply.

Meaning an open circuit is not a circuit? The resistance across the wires is implied in this example. The question was spurred by the apparent direct connection by all battery's + or - poles to the plates.
 
Nov 2014
16
0
Are each battery individually serial or parallel or both?
I mean internally, is the 1.5v a series of lower voltage electrons or a parallel where all the electrons contribute to the potential voltage or both?