In the beginning

Status
Not open for further replies.
Nov 2019
45
3
Pittsburgh
Yes, I'm aware of what the mainstream thinks. I don't buy it. Doesn't it make more sense for the voids to be caused by antimatter? It gives us a 50/50 cosmic web of matter and void.

I get to claim voids don't have spacetime because of this.
 
Nov 2019
45
3
Pittsburgh
There is evidence that particles of matter and antimatter are constantly being formed out of the "nothing",
but they quickly cancel each other out (leaving "nothing" again).
I don't think voids have this type of activity.
I wish they would do that test at close to absolute zero.
 
Jun 2016
1,198
565
England
Your CERN link includes this statement:
Antimatter particles share the same mass as their matter counterparts
Experiments have been performed at CERN with the specific intention of determining if antimatter and gravity behave in the same manner as matter and gravity.
To the limits of all experiments so far conducted, they do.

Mass causes gravitational lensing.
Astronomers have seen many examples of gravitational lensing, but only from matter filled galaxies, not from the empty voids.
Does this not suggest that your idea of antimatter in the voids cannot be correct.
 
Nov 2019
45
3
Pittsburgh
I'm not saying antimatter is around anymore. It did its job and annihilated regular matter ..creating voids.
 
Nov 2019
45
3
Pittsburgh
You have me wondering if Dark Matter is Antimatter that didn't touch Matter.
 
Jun 2016
1,198
565
England
I can perhaps accept that antimatter created the voids,
As it says in the CERN article, the theory as it currently stands would indicate equal amounts of matter and antimatter in the initial big-bang
but some unknown "something" caused an imbalance.
This resulted in relatively small regions where the matter and antimatter did not cancel each other.
These regions are where we now have galaxies, and galaxy clusters, separated by voids which contain very little (but not zero) matter.

The imprint of, the very rarefied, matter in the voids can be seen in the spectra of distant galaxies.
 
  • Like
Reactions: cosmicweb
Jun 2016
1,198
565
England
Dark matter is a totally different kettle of worms.
We have essentially no idea what it is.
Almost every idea about it is still up for grabs.
 
  • Like
Reactions: cosmicweb
Nov 2019
45
3
Pittsburgh
The voids can contain some matter and still not have spacetime. If it has a physical state it's because it was birthed in spacetime and then tossed into the void.
 
Last edited:

topsquark

Forum Staff
Apr 2008
2,978
631
On the dance floor, baby!
The voids can contain some matter and still not have spacetime. If it has a physical state it's because it was birthed in spacetime and then tossed into the void.
I am going to say this one last time: If there is a such a thing as a void without space-time it would not be part of this Universe, by definintion. You would not be able to see it (even as a region of darkness.) It would not attract or repel anything via gravity or any other force. You would not be able to calculate anything about it with GR. Nothing from this Universe could ever enter such a region, nor can anything from the void be able to leave it to enter this Universe. It would be compeletly cut off from the observable Universe and you would have no idea that it is even there.

All you are doing is making a bunch of non-sensical statements. You need experimental proof, not what you think is right.

Thread closed.

-Dan
 
Status
Not open for further replies.