In the beginning

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What makes you think unobserved quantum voids can't function without spacetime? This is why we don't currently have a unifying theory of everything.
 
Nov 2019
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BTW, I'm fine with voids not being part of the observable universe if that helps. ..but you have to accept light can travel in areas not part of the observable universe.
 
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I would not be surprised to find that light travels through voids instantly.
 
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I think when the cosmic web was first created, it started as plasma. It turned into dark matter and when later observed, the cosmic filaments turned into something like Neutron Stars. We know colliding Neutron Stars give us all the elements, so it's not much of a reach to think the early filaments were like this. Imagine all that exploding like dynamite ..I'd call that a big bang.
 
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topsquark

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What makes you think unobserved quantum voids can't function without spacetime? This is why we don't currently have a unifying theory of everything.
Do you have any actual proof of that statement? If so, then share it. If not then you need to accept that regions that don't have space-time are not part of this Universe.... That's no more complicated than mapmaking. Regions that don't have coordinates simply aren't on the map.

Again you are making a large number of unverified (and likely unverifiable) statements. Please present some proof of these ideas or else I'm ending the discussion.

-Dan
 
Nov 2019
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You want Einsteins field equation to handle voids outside its defined spacetime.
 
Jun 2016
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I've been trying to follow your discussion, but can't seem to get a grip on it.
I'm not sure what your argument is.
I'm not sure what you intend when you mention voids.
Are you trying to argue that in the space between galaxies there is literally nothing?
 
Nov 2019
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Yes. The shape of the cosmic web is extremely bothersome to me. Did antimatter cause cosmic voids?
 

topsquark

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On the dance floor, baby!
Yes. The shape of the cosmic web is extremely bothersome to me. Did antimatter cause cosmic voids?
Supposedly it is dark matter that is mostly responsible for any clumping of matter in the early Universe. I'm not sure how it works either.

We've been talking about voids... The empty spaces between the filiments... Is this what you've been refering to when you are talking about voids where there is no space-time? The are part of the Universe and simply don't have any concentration of matter. But they are described using space-time like anything else in the Universe.

-Dan
 
Jun 2016
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The voids between Galaxies (and even more so the voids between galaxy clusters) don't contain much, but it isn't nothing.
What exists when there is no matter present is a difficult philosophical concept.
One might perhaps view it as being the potential for existence?
(but that is just my own thought, others will probably have different interpretations).
There is evidence that particles of matter and antimatter are constantly being formed out of the "nothing",
but they quickly cancel each other out (leaving "nothing" again).
One of the mysteries of the "big-bang" idea is, why we ended up with a preponderance of matter,
rather than the expected equal amounts of matter and antimatter, which should have cancelled each other out.
 
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