Gravity and Anti-matter

topsquark

Forum Staff
Apr 2008
2,944
619
On the dance floor, baby!
You might find this to be an intriguing concept. The idea has been kicking about since the early 50's if I have my dates correct. Personally I don't agree with the idea that anti-matter is repulsed by ordinary matter but it would be fun if they did. (Note that the gravitational force between an electron and positron is swamped by the electromagnetic force so they can still collide if left on their own.)

-Dan
 

ChipB

PHF Helper
Jun 2010
2,361
289
Morristown, NJ USA
Interesting - I wouldn't have thought that this was seriously open to debate. I guess what they are doing is measuring the gravitational constant G as it applies to antimatter-matter attraction. Wouldn't it be interesting of it turns out to be 0 or negative - though I agree with you that I don't see why it would be different than "regular" G. If it does turn out to be different, then they'll have to figure a way to measure G for antimatter-antimatter, which I think would be incredibly difficult given the small amount of material they have to work with.
 

MBW

Apr 2008
668
21
Bedford, England
I am sure that somewhere I read a (short) article that indicated that at CERN,
(in a side chamber away from the main LHC)
they were combining anti-protons and positrons to create neutral atoms of anti-hydrogen.

One of the studies indicated for this anti-hydrogen was the response of these anti-atoms to the earths gravitational field.

I have no idea how sucsessful (or otherwise) these studies were.

(Is the gravitiational response of anti-matter dependent of the date?)
 
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topsquark

Forum Staff
Apr 2008
2,944
619
On the dance floor, baby!
I am sure that somewhere I read a (short) article that indicated that at CERN,
(in a side chamber away from the main LHC)
they were combining anti-protons and positrons to create neutral atoms of anti-hydrogen.

One of the studies indicated for this anti-hydrogen was the response of these anti-atoms to the earths gravitational field.

I have no idea how sucsessful (or otherwise) these studies were.

(Is the gravitiational response of anti-matter dependent of the date?)
There have been a few experiments in the past that hinted of an anti-gravity effect, but if memory serves they couldn't repeat the results. As the article -states we need far more anti-hydrogen than they can create at the moment.

-Dan