Expansion - Inflation - in an infinite Universe

Status
Not open for further replies.
Apr 2019
77
1
Inflation - expansion. Need an explanation - Last piece to explain logically past the breakdown of the math. My thinking is once I get the link clearly demonstrated that it Cycles BB - Gravity - BB - Gravity on larger scales then Math can be applied to whats we are all missing.


https://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/40861/20190427/mystery-of-the-universes-expansion-rate-widens-with-new-hubble-data.htm

If I take a million visible universes. Keep in mind I have no Idea how many knots there will be. But lets just throw 100,000 for concept purposes.

one of physics quarks has a supper amount of mass. This brings a thought that if 1 out of every so many knots merges with another. It just an odd one here and there. Would this over that area pull the remaining knots apart.

Then we just do this over infinity. Would the pull in all direction try to average the distance. Evetime You get a gravitational wave its 1 less point source. Nature tries to balance out. In a closed system with no wall it collapses. With a wall they just get more space but further out goes nowhere Probably collapse. Last but not least Infinity. Pulls in every direction And they average out with no wall to slow at an edge so seems faster farther away.

Interesting thought is the simple effect of our own early pooling well after physics big bang from farther and farther and farther away is just getting here Yet to get here. Just feeling the need to balance Yet to feel the need to balance. Need to add distance and time to feel any effect elsewhere Out to infinity.

I guess that's adding relativity to the need to Balance and a whole system lag in a sense.

Speed up slow down speed up slow down but never stopping because the one leads to the other. Feedback loop.

https://www.livescience.com/65300-hawking-black-hole-theory-unlikely.html

they would be tiny as this link highlights Quark gluon plasma in the large scale structure and a lot of stuff will not make it in (dark matter)

Quark gluon plasma forming a quark in the large scale structure of the universe.

https://www.eso.org/sci/publications/announcements/sciann14070.html

More reading here - im posting stuff here as well

http://physicshelpforum.com/philosophy-physics/15197-missing-anti-matter.html



http://physicshelpforum.com/philosophy-physics/15197-missing-anti-matter.html

Ultimately all the universe needs to do Or the link to be found is a process Isolating chunks of matter far enough apart so gravity between is week enough that the forces can take hold - We see that happening in the largescale structure of the universe. The missing piece is why is it expanding to do this why did it expand to do this.

Hope I gave a simple explanation.

One simple thing there is still a space stretching due to the compression in the growing wells but the universe is trying to balance as stated above. Its a combination of Balancing Plus the stretching or it does not work. I mean there is a stretching going on. This to has to be applied in an infinite universe Not Closed. With the same composition Generally no matter how far away you go. I realised this was not enough(the stretching) which brought me to the balance which brings me to what was forgot because it appears Space is expanding. In a finite system this also would cause collapse but there is nothing finite about it so Just as they move to balance out, there is also a stretching between.
 
Oct 2017
578
297
Glasgow
Inflation - expansion. Need an explanation - Last piece to explain logically past the breakdown of the math.
Actually, inflation is the phenomenon that has the best mathematical agreement (with the canonical big bang theory) in the whole field of cosmology, so your initial premise is exactly backwards. The big bang theory has problems, but inflation is not one of them.

If I take a million visible universes.
By definition, there is only one universe; the cosmos and everything in it.

Some scientists talk about the "universe" and the "observable universe", in which case the latter is a subset of the former and represents the part of the universe that we can see with telescopes.

Keep in mind I have no Idea how many knots there will be. But lets just throw 100,000 for concept purposes.

...
The rest of your post doesn't make any sense to me.

Please... buy an introductory text book and read it. You will learn much, much more from a book than any set of internet articles. In the least, it will give you the proper terms for the things you want to talk about so we don't have to translate everything you say into what you actually mean.
 
Apr 2019
77
1
Well you can't seem to apply inflation to expansion yet clearly there is a link.

I just suggested a link which you actually did not argue.

I know there is one universe and its infinite.

I was using it as a distance ruler - I know you know that.

Of course you don't understand me - Your stuck in a train of thinking which its math has broke down and can't explain the universe well past a range(big bang) - It can't connect before and after the big bang well - its STUCK.
 
Apr 2019
77
1
Get off the ego - so I don't have the terminology, I'm seeing something you can't without it. All you do is come here and put me down for lack of it yet you did not argue my actual point. You sorta did - Actually you did not - you just said this(side) is well explained (tossed it off and moved on) But im pointing out it is not.
 

topsquark

Forum Staff
Apr 2008
2,978
631
On the dance floor, baby!
Get off the ego - so I don't have the terminology, I'm seeing something you can't without it. All you do is come here and put me down for lack of it yet you did not argue my actual point. You sorta did - Actually you did not - you just said this(side) is well explained (tossed it off and moved on) But im pointing out it is not.
I'm afraid that I have to agree with benet13 here. You need to spend some time with the basics.

Just to check: Do you know what the Standard Model says about quarks and their interactions? Specifically that quarks make up the vast majority of what we call matter and how the strong nuclear force operates in terms of color? What about gluons?

-Dan
 
Jun 2016
1,198
565
England
I find it very difficult to follow your arguments,
They seem disjointed with unexpected conceptual leaps and connections.
Your use of terms, which have particular precise meanings in physics, in unfamiliar ways is also discombobulating.

You need to remember that people on forums like this are using their free-time and are participating for "fun"
I am afraid that if you want your thoughts to be considered,
you will need to make them easier to follow.
It is just human nature to label things as "not worth the effort".

For me, I'm sorry but, your ideas definitely fall into that category.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 person
Oct 2017
578
297
Glasgow
Get off the ego - so I don't have the terminology, I'm seeing something you can't without it. All you do is come here and put me down for lack of it yet you did not argue my actual point. You sorta did - Actually you did not - you just said this(side) is well explained (tossed it off and moved on) But im pointing out it is not.
It's nothing personal and I certainly have no intention of putting you (or anyone else, for that matter) down.

The purpose of my comments is to help give you honest feedback on your work, nothing else. I would give the same advice to anyone else.

I'm not tossing anything aside... it's genuinely hard to understand your ideas.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 person
Oct 2017
578
297
Glasgow
Well you can't seem to apply inflation to expansion yet clearly there is a link. I just suggested a link which you actually did not argue.
Yes, I can't argue that because "expansion" and "inflation" are two names for the same thing. That said, the term "expansion" is used more generally to describe things that get bigger over time, whereas "inflation" is almost exclusively used to describe the expanding universe (at least in cosmology).

I know there is one universe and its infinite.
Careful... by definition there is one universe, yes, but we don't actually know if it's infinite or not. That's why scientists often distinguish between the "universe" and the "observable universe", because although we have no idea whether the universe is infinite, the observable universe is definitely finite.

There's no problem assuming an infinite universe if you like, as long as you're aware that it's not something we can definitely prove.

It might seem like I'm being awkward, but I'm genuinely not... these definitions exist for good reasons and being aware of them is important if you want to do research.

I was using it as a distance ruler - I know you know that.
I honestly don't know that... distances in cosmology are usually given in terms of gigaparsecs (Gpc) or in terms of red-shift values (especially for things like deep-field observations).

Of course you don't understand me - Your stuck in a train of thinking which its math has broke down and can't explain the universe well past a range(big bang) - It can't connect before and after the big bang well - its STUCK.
I studied cosmology at university and although I certainly didn't grasp everything in my studies perfectly, I at least know the standard terminology and the basics of the canonical theories (stuff like the big bang, inflation, early universe structure, matter-radiation decoupling, cosmic microwave background, topology, chemical evolution, galactic morphology and evolution, fate of the universe). If you want to claim I'm somehow "stuck" in some standard way of thinking, then feel free to tell all the other research physicists the same, because they also use the same terminology in their published literature.

I have done a lot of maths, in general, but concerning cosmology I've only covered the basics. Topsquark is probably better equipped to deal with the more heavy duty maths stuff than I *cough* :p

If I wanted to start coming up with my own cosmological theories, I would definitely have to do a lot work going through textbooks and learning as much as I can. However, my motivation is to learn convex optimisation theory and algorithms at the moment because I have side-stepped to the energy sector and I don't have time to study both that and cosmology.

However, if you wanted to study a particular textbook, I'd actually be willing to purchase the same book and help go through it with you. I'm generally a busy person, but I don't mind making time as long as it's physics-related. Besides, cosmology is really interesting. It would actually benefit both of us :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 person
Apr 2019
77
1
I hear ya woody I just leave it all be - laters And enjoy
 
Apr 2019
77
1
Sometimes things happen in life And I found when the pressure of it all builds I tend to run to my old school library and pull out the book. I lost that long ago and all the terms but not the passion.

I think Its time to drop this childness and face the world.

Thanks for the offer bennit, One day if I'm back this way Maybe ill take you up on it, Might be good for more than just me.

I firmly believe the universe is infinite, I simply tried to find arguments for it. I don't disbelieve Big bang, I simply think something is missing. I can't help but wonder is its Infinity. That's all.

Time to get back to Life.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.