Energy Conservation 1

Jul 2008
179
1
An object of mass equal to 1 kg is under the action of a force resulting given by \(\displaystyle F=-3x-5x^2\) where F is given in newtons. (a) What is the potential energy of an object at x = 2 m? (b) If the object has a speed equal to 4 m / s in the negative sense when it is in position x = 5 m what is its speed as it passes through the origin?



Answer:
(a) 19,3 J
(b) 22,5 m/s
 

topsquark

Forum Staff
Apr 2008
3,115
661
On the dance floor, baby!
An object of mass equal to 1 kg is under the action of a force resulting given by \(\displaystyle F=-3x-5x^2\) where F is given in newtons. (a) What is the potential energy of an object at x = 2 m? (b) If the object has a speed equal to 4 m / s in the negative sense when it is in position x = 5 m what is its speed as it passes through the origin?



Answer:
(a) 19,3 J
(b) 22,5 m/s
a) Hint: \(\displaystyle \Delta V = \int F~dx\)
You technically need to define a zero point level for this potential energy function, so all you can find is the change of potential energy between two points. However you can easily see, if you integrate the function as an indefinite integral (and ignore the arbitrary constant) there is already a "built in" zero point. This is how you are going to get your solution.

b) Another hint: The force here is not required to be conservative so you can't apply conservation of energy directly. But you can still say that
\(\displaystyle W_{nc} = \Delta E = \Delta K\)
(presumably there is no vertical displacement) and use the given force as a non-conservative force. So
\(\displaystyle \int_5^0 (-3x - 5x^2)~dx = \Delta K\)
I'll leave it to you to determine why there isn't a negative sign in front of the integral.

-Dan
 

topsquark

Forum Staff
Apr 2008
3,115
661
On the dance floor, baby!
You solve not use the diferencial calculo?
I can't think of a way to approach this using differentials. Integral Calculus is the only way I can think of to get this one.

-Dan