Electroweak Bosons

Sep 2019
21
3
low nuclear orbit
Have the W1, W2, W3, and B bosons ever been observed? It's my understanding that at energies above 246 GeV they mediate the electroweak force. However if they've never been observed, then why is it always stated that all fundamental particles in the Standard Model have been observed other than the graviton?
 

topsquark

Forum Staff
Apr 2008
3,048
647
On the dance floor, baby!
Have the W1, W2, W3, and B bosons ever been observed? It's my understanding that at energies above 246 GeV they mediate the electroweak force. However if they've never been observed, then why is it always stated that all fundamental particles in the Standard Model have been observed other than the graviton?
You've got the right bosons, but they are from before the Universe underwent what is effectively a change in phase. (Electroweak symmetry breaking is the official term.) The W1, W2, W3, and B particles became the W+, W-, Z0, and the photon, all of what have been observed. If we ramp up the energy of the collisions we should be able to find the three W's and the B but that's beyond the abilities of the current generation of synchrotons. (The Higgs was found a couple of years ago which is a big step in confirming these particles' existence.)

-Dan
 
Sep 2019
21
3
low nuclear orbit
In that case they really shouldn't say that they've observed all the particles of the Standard Model, imo
 

topsquark

Forum Staff
Apr 2008
3,048
647
On the dance floor, baby!
In that case they really shouldn't say that they've observed all the particles of the Standard Model, imo
I agree. The derivation of the Electoweak system makes their existence necessary but we need to have a way to detect them in a region where the symmetry has not been broken.. at very high energies. As attractive the theory is (I'm a theorist) it needs more experimental evidence.

-Dan