Einstein's theory of relativity

Mar 2020
2
0
USA
Hello, I have a question about a possible revision of Einstein's theory of relativity. The fact is that its root error is indicated by the fact that at the initial moment of time, that is, when all three coordinates of the two systems coincide, we mistakenly decided at some point in time to take the speed as constant c instead of the variable dc, we got that at an infinitely small point in time, a constant final velocity was recorded — obviously, this does not happen. Therefore, when I typed the following expression in wolfram mathematica: {d (x ^ 2) + d (y ^ 2) + d (z ^ 2) == (dk) ^ 2 * (dt) ^ 2, d (w ^ 2 ) + d (y ^ 2) + d (z ^ 2) == (dk) ^ 2 * (df) ^ 2}, he in one of the solutions gave an answer that is quite suitable for the context of the problem in understanding the absolute time (with the Reduce command ) Please explain if it is possible in simple terms, do I have the right to such an interpretation as one of the interpretations, and maybe, if my reasoning is correct, I will incorrectly interpret the theory of relativity itself — but if it’s incorrect, how should I interpret it? Thank you very much!
 
Apr 2015
1,238
359
Somerset, England
we mistakenly decided at some point in time to take the speed as constant c instead of the variable dc, we got that at an infinitely small point in time, a constant final velocity was recorded
Perhaps if you were to rephrase this we might be able understand what you mean.

c is the speed of light at all times and all places (coordinates) in Special Relativity.
 
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Mar 2020
2
0
USA
but the speed of light does not instantly apply — it also takes some time to travel a constant path c, but we must take into account that both systems move relative to each other with a velocity v less than c (modulo), and Einstein’s theory of relativity assumes instantaneous perception of the final signal c when all coordinates coincide, that is, for an infinitely small period of time.
 

topsquark

Forum Staff
Apr 2008
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On the dance floor, baby!
but the speed of light does not instantly apply — it also takes some time to travel a constant path c, but we must take into account that both systems move relative to each other with a velocity v less than c (modulo), and Einstein’s theory of relativity assumes instantaneous perception of the final signal c when all coordinates coincide, that is, for an infinitely small period of time.
We usually choose the coordinate systems to coincide at t = 0, so you don't need to think about the time that way, much less anything instantaneous. That c is a constant has been measured and is one of the initial assumptions to derive the Lorentz transformation so it doesn't matter where or when or how you measure c.

-Dan
 
Apr 2015
1,238
359
Somerset, England
I'm sorry that is even less clear than before.

In the first post you said c is a speed.
Now you say it is a path.

Please make your mind up what you actually want to say.
 
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Jun 2016
1,370
695
England
Judging by your phrasing English is not your native language.
A lot of your intention seems to be getting lost in the translation.

You are using very long sentences,
It is more difficult to extract the meaning from one long, oddly translated, rather complicated sentence,
than it is to extract the same meaning from several, still oddly translated but, individually much simpler sentences.

Note the way that other members break up their posts visually,
with new lines and blank lines.
This makes the start and end of different ideas within a post much clearer.