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Old Feb 15th 2014, 08:55 AM   #1
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Stanton number

Hi,

i'm currently trying to size a heat exchanger and have been using Kays and London as a reference book. i have come across a calculation for the heat transfer coefficient:
h = StGCp where St = the Stanton number, G = mass velocity and Cp = specific heat.

In the text book it shows that StPr 2/3 over Re (Reynolds number) graph and states that from calculation of the the Re, StPr 2/3 can be determined. it also states that the Stanton number can be determined from the graph, however does not explain how this number can be determined.

can anybody help!!1
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Old Feb 19th 2014, 09:38 AM   #2
MBW
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Not sure if this helps you, but...

Reynolds number is the Ratio of the Inertial Forces acting within the fluid to the Viscous Forces acting within the fluid.
In other words it is a measure of the tendency for the bulk fluid to keep moving relative to the tendancy for the fluid near a surface to stop moving.

It is a function of the speed of the movement and the viscosity of the fluid.

Reynolds is proportional to Speed*Density/Viscosity

The Reynolds number is closely related to the transition of a flow from laminar to turbulent.
The heat transfer in turbulent flow is much more effective than in laminar flow.
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