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Old Jun 16th 2019, 06:17 AM   #1
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Magnetohydrodynamics - Space Weather & Atmospheric currents

Hello! I would like to hear some professional opinion about a model of interactions between magnetosphere and atmosphere. I'm not a professional physicist, but I did everything, to make it fully consistent with officialy approved knowledge. I will provide you the links to publications and articles, which I've used to support my statements. Mechanism of my model uses the laws of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and is based on multiple scientific data, like: SWMF+RCM magnetosphere/ionosphere simulations, readings from THEMIS satellites and ground magnetometers, just as weather maps and forecasts. My model has the potenial, to revolutionize our understanding of connections between meteorology and heliophysics.



Here's link to a movie, which explains the basic mechanics of my model:
Electromagnetic Universe - Magnetism & Atmospheric Currents


And here are 2 more, which explain it in details:
Space Weather Affecting Climate On Earth - Magnetic Reconnections And Plasma Outflows
Climate Changes & Geomagnetic Instability - Space Weather And Atmosphere Interactions

It's funny, that despite the fact, that MHD seems to be one the most functional branches of physics - both, theroretical and practical ones - there's not too many scientists interested in it. I'm pretty sure, that not all of you heard about such terms, like: magnetic reconnection or flux transfer event (fte). Since those processes are playing a key role in my model, here are the definitions from wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_reconnection

Magnetic reconnection is a physical process occurring in highly conducting plasmas in which the magnetic topology is rearranged and magnetic energy is converted to kinetic energy, thermal energy, and particle acceleration. Magnetic reconnection occurs on timescales intermediate between slow resistive diffusion of the magnetic field and fast Alfvénictimescales.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux_transfer_event

A flux transfer event (FTE) occurs when a magnetic portal opens in the Earth's magnetosphere through which high-energy particles flow from the Sun. This connection, while previously thought to be permanent, has been found to be brief and very dynamic. The European Space Agency's four Cluster spacecraft and NASA's five THEMIS probes have flown through and surrounded these FTEs, measuring their dimensions and identifying the particles that are transferred between the magnetic fields.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux_tube

A flux tube is a generally tube-like (cylindrical) region of space containing a magnetic field, B, such that the field is perpendicular to the normal vector. Both the cross-sectional area of the tube and the field contained may vary along the length of the tube, but the magnetic flux is always constant.







Ok, this was just the introduction. I want to explain all the details of my model in next posts. For now I will paste here the links to publications, which I will use in my explanations:

Clouds blown by the solar wind
Paper suggests solar magnetic influence on Earth’s atmospheric pressure
influence of Solar Magnetic Sector Structure on Terrestrial Atmospheric Vorticity
The interplanetary magnetic field influences mid-latitude surface atmospheric pressure
Solar Activity and Earth's Climate
THE CURIOUS CASE OF EARTH'S LEAKING ATMOSPHERE
Magnetic field changes
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Old Jun 17th 2019, 02:53 AM   #2
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I have some basic feedback for the moment, but later I can try to catch up on some reading regarding solar system magnetic systems and update you on it. I studied a little bit of this kind of stuff during my degree a long time ago.

Originally Posted by GatheringKnowledge View Post
Hello! I would like to hear some professional opinion about a model of interactions between magnetosphere and atmosphere. I'm not a professional physicist, but I did everything, to make it fully consistent with officialy approved knowledge.
No problem. You've come to the right place!

I will provide you the links to publications and articles, which I've used to support my statements.
Most of the links you have provided are to YouTube videos and wikipedia. Although there's nothing particularly wrong with this, better references are things like journal papers and textbooks, since they are peer reviewed, high quality publications. Wikipedia tends to be good quality because it's community-corrected, but it can sometimes have errors or be out of date, and YouTube is pretty much the pits.

So, if you want your models to be up to date and informed, you'll need to hit journal papers. It can be difficult for amateur physicists or industry professionals because some journals have egregious paywalls on their content, so knowing someone in academia who can hook you up with papers is always good.

Mechanism of my model uses the laws of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and is based on multiple scientific data, like: SWMF+RCM magnetosphere/ionosphere simulations, readings from THEMIS satellites and ground magnetometers, just as weather maps and forecasts. My model has the potenial, to revolutionize our understanding of connections between meteorology and heliophysics.
So... first off, a basic no-no, never make big claims without big evidence.. If you start saying things like "It has potential to revolutionize <insert thing here>", it's a massive indication you have no idea what you're talking about or doing and most people will stop listening to you immediately. Here on the forum, we've heard dozens of people say the xact same thing and they all turn out to be coming up with silly, uninformed nonsense.

Be humble, do your work as honestly as you can and do your best to make the arguments you're working on rock solid. In fact, one of the hardest things to learn as a scientists is to admit where you're wrong and adapt accordingly. We've all had to do it and, in some cases, we even publish corrections. It's much more embarrassing to keep chugging at a theory that simply doesn't work rather than admit that some of your publications are out of date because something else turned out to work better.

If you continue your studies and your work turns out not to be "revolutionary", than it doesn't matter because you're still making a contribution to the field and people will still care about your contribution, reference your publications and recognise your name. If it turns out to be revolutionary, than great, but never claim it... let it speak for itself.

The images are fine... just sort of cartoon drawings of trajectories of charged particles along field lines, so it seems fairly standard stuff. For publications it can sometimes be hard to draw good quality diagrams, so the tips I have for those are just to keep it simple. Simple graphs and line drawings are always better than colourful artistic depictions in relaying information about specific functions, curves, relationships, data or any other quantitative information. Let the artists worry about the pretty stuff!

It's funny, that despite the fact, that MHD seems to be one the most functional branches of physics - both, theroretical and practical ones - there's not too many scientists interested in it.
This is not true. There's plenty of research groups in Europe alone that investigate MHD. I attended a post-graduate conference at Keele University about 10 years ago and there was a whole room filled with people exclusively researching MHD applied to the Earth's magnetopshere, although some also investigated the Sun's atmosphere. There's also a research group in Manchester that looks at MHD, but they're more interested in the solar dynamo problem and magnetic reconnection.

Magnetic reconnection is a physical process occurring in highly conducting plasmas in which the magnetic topology is rearranged and magnetic energy is converted to kinetic energy, thermal energy, and particle acceleration. Magnetic reconnection occurs on timescales intermediate between slow resistive diffusion of the magnetic field and fast Alfvénictimescales.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux_transfer_event

A flux transfer event (FTE) occurs when a magnetic portal opens in the Earth's magnetosphere through which high-energy particles flow from the Sun. This connection, while previously thought to be permanent, has been found to be brief and very dynamic. The European Space Agency's four Cluster spacecraft and NASA's five THEMIS probes have flown through and surrounded these FTEs, measuring their dimensions and identifying the particles that are transferred between the magnetic fields.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux_tube

A flux tube is a generally tube-like (cylindrical) region of space containing a magnetic field, B, such that the field is perpendicular to the normal vector. Both the cross-sectional area of the tube and the field contained may vary along the length of the tube, but the magnetic flux is always constant.

<images>

Ok, this was just the introduction. I want to explain all the details of my model in next posts. For now I will paste here the links to publications, which I will use in my explanations:

Clouds blown by the solar wind
Paper suggests solar magnetic influence on Earth’s atmospheric pressure
influence of Solar Magnetic Sector Structure on Terrestrial Atmospheric Vorticity
The interplanetary magnetic field influences mid-latitude surface atmospheric pressure
Solar Activity and Earth's Climate
THE CURIOUS CASE OF EARTH'S LEAKING ATMOSPHERE
Magnetic field changes
I don't have time to click all the URLs and read all the information, but from first glance this stuff seems fine, like a recap of some of the stuff I studied at University. I have my textbook on EM handy as well.

I will be interested in reading more about the state of the art regarding MHD and magnetic reconnection. I look forward to your next few posts!
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Old Jun 17th 2019, 03:26 PM   #3
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While you may be correct that MHD is perhaps not currently regarded as the most fashionable area of study,
There are plenty of physicists looking into exactly the features you describe.

I freely admit I am just an armchair observer of the physics world,
however I have seen several articles in scientific and astronomical magazines describing the current research, such as Themis, in this area.

I am sure that the people at the Joint European Torus at Culham in Oxfordshire
are also deeply involved in such studies.

One of the key problems at JET is maintaining a stable plasma,
As has been observed by Themis the interchange between magnetic field and plasma tends to be extremely dynamic.

It is probable that there are possibilities for fruitful cross-overs of ideas between the Fusion Reactor studies and Solar Wind interaction studies.
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Old Jun 19th 2019, 05:04 PM   #4
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It being a slow evening, I had a glance at some of the papers you linked to.

They are pretty much outside my realm, but seem to indicate notable interactions between the atmosphere, and both terrestrial and solar magnetosphere;
and that fairly clear correlations can be found between these interactions and terrestrial weather patterns.

As I noted in my last post I am an armchair observer of science, and I have noted a light scattering of articles, over the years, in the scientific magazines I subscribe to, relating to this subject.

Interestingly the earlier articles seemed slightly dismissive, the correlation was perhaps a bit vague, and no causative mechanism was put forward.
However, the more recent articles seem to be becoming more positive, I guess that with more and better data the correlations are becoming more clearly defined.

The causative mechanisms though seem to remain vague and rather speculative.
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