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Old May 7th 2019, 03:25 PM   #1
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Does spacetime resist distortion

For normal everyday waves, the wave is created by pushing a system out of equilibrium and that system generating a restorative action to pull itself back to the equilibrium position, overshooting and returning, etc...

If we apply this to gravity waves, does this imply that spacetime will produce a restorative action to reverse any distortion (and thus propagate a gravity wave)?

Or am I pushing the analogy too far?
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Old May 7th 2019, 06:55 PM   #2
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Woody:
Interesting and profound topic!
I have not yet researched gravitional wave indepth.
I hope that you should draw that wave profile in the first quadant only. Otherwise, you will render this semi - tramp able to see Einstein, or turn him into anti matter, worstly probably send him to a symmetric cosmos...haha
It seems that the wave profile should be an irregular pulse, I guess
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Old May 7th 2019, 08:32 PM   #3
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According to establishment science gravitational waves were observed for the first time in 2015 .... now other scientists have found something very fishy going on ...almost suggesting results were fixed ....5 min video

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Old May 7th 2019, 08:45 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Woody View Post
If we apply this to gravity waves, does this imply that spacetime will produce a restorative action to reverse any distortion (and thus propagate a gravity wave)?
Or am I pushing the analogy too far?
I don't think the theory would allow for any restorative action (gravitational push).... a wave must surely be just a cyclical change in the amount of pull.

We are told two merging black holes create a wave ... that the Earth would stretch by the thickness of an atom experiencing this wave ... I don't see how merging masses , or rotating masses can give an observer the impression that mass is varying ... basically a wave can only occur if mass (effectively) appears or disappears
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Old May 8th 2019, 12:48 AM   #5
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Red face mass vs mass

Oz:
I have to bemoan again here that the explanation in modern physics about space (even 3D) is unsatisfatory and insufficient. The space what are under talking is "physical" space. It's another guy ****9876 who can explain more, not this guy...
Draw a straight line between the center of the Earth and the center of one of the black hole. Spread their masses evenly on the staight line. The average mass density on the straight line will be created. When another black hole come in, the average mass density will change. It's mass - mass "interaction". This is this guy's simple opinion.
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