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Old Apr 23rd 2018, 04:41 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by lovebunny View Post
SR is based on Maxwell's equations that are not luminous, for one. Does not anyone find this odd?
Again, "not luminous." What exactly do you mean by this?

And SR is based on the two postulates I mentioned in another thread. That they derive the same Lorentz transformations as predicted by EM doesn't mean that SR is only about EM. It goes the other way, it is SR that is transcendent and we know that the Maxwell equations are a good theory because they respect them. Not the way History would have it, but true none-the-less.

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Old Apr 24th 2018, 12:53 PM   #12
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What do you mean by "luminous"? If I were to interpret your statement that "Maxwell's equation are not luminous" strictly, I would think that you were saying that Maxwell's equations do not light up!

Maxwell's equation relate a changing magnetic field to a changing electric field and lead to the conclusion that they give rise to waves in an electromagnetic field. The calculation of the speed of those waves results in the conclusion that they move at the speed of light! That lead to the conclusion that light waves are waves in an elctro-magnetic field. Is that what you mean by "luminous"? Maxwell's equations do not themselves talk about "light" but that they relate to light can be easily derived from them.
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Old Apr 25th 2018, 10:20 AM   #13
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not------>used with an auxiliary verb or “be” to form the negative.


lu·mi·nous PHYSICS --relating to light as it is perceived by the eye.


Not luminous means does not produce light that is perceived by the eye.
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Old Apr 25th 2018, 11:49 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by lovebunny View Post
not------>used with an auxiliary verb or “be” to form the negative.


lu·mi·nous PHYSICS --relating to light as it is perceived by the eye.


Not luminous means does not produce light that is perceived by the eye.
You can't see electric and magnetic fields either. Why is this a problem? For example you are making a big deal about Faraday's induction equation. Gauss' law isn't "luminous" either. You seem to accept this one. What's the difference?

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Old Apr 25th 2018, 11:54 AM   #15
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Are you confusing the terms

lumeniferous aether and luminous aether?

Equations don't give off light unless you write them in some form of luminous paint and count that.

But Maxwell's equations do support the possibility of a lumeniferous aether.

FYI lumeniferous means that it is capable of supports Young's waves.
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Old Apr 28th 2018, 02:33 PM   #16
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You comment is accepted as a justification of my theory. Thank you very much for you generous support since the electric and magnetic field are as you have stated not visual which if facts is another proof that Maxwell's equations are not luminous. Also, you are absolutely correct that equations do not give off light which is followed with the paint analogy which is a great justification of my theory. Thank you very much.
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Old Apr 28th 2018, 05:11 PM   #17
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Someone posted something about symmetry of SR and I was wonder where that was since I cannot find the statement but I will answer the symmetry. First, it would be proper to define symmetry: the quality of being made up of exactly similar parts facing each other or around an axis. Well, first I need to know what structure is being questioned since it would make difference since the structure are multi-faceted in terms of theoretical concetuality of symmetry in regards to the ambiguality of SR in regards the the structure that is being implied which bring to the for front the necessity to first define that which appears to be diametrical in nature in a macroscopic sense when clarify will begin the discussion to a beginning. I eagerly wait for more clarification in the said missing parts to forwardly progress. Thank you for you acceptance of the facts prescribed.
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Old Apr 28th 2018, 08:55 PM   #18
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@lovebunny:
You need to do some backup reading.

See here for a rundown on the Poincare group.

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Old May 1st 2018, 01:47 PM   #19
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Could you give us a little run down of poincare theory? It would save time and energy.
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Old May 1st 2018, 07:28 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by lovebunny View Post
Could you give us a little run down of poincare theory? It would save time and energy.
Very simply stated, the Poincare group represents both rotation as well as translation symmetries in Minkowski space.

The article I recommended is about as simple as it gets. Aside from typing out the derivations here (whichwould be rather time consuming) perhaps you can give me a starting point for you if you tell me where you are having problem?

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Last edited by topsquark; May 1st 2018 at 07:32 PM.
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