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Old Mar 27th 2016, 09:29 AM   #1
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Flywheel Drive Torque

How much Torque is required for a flywheel of (Inertia wk2=1500 lb-ft2) to accelerate upto 1500 RPM in duration of 80 Seconds?
The input drive is a Hydromotor with a displacement of 11.88 cu.inch per revolution.
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Old Mar 27th 2016, 10:31 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by yedulas View Post
How much Torque is required for a flywheel of (Inertia wk2=1500 lb-ft2) to accelerate upto 1500 RPM in duration of 80 Seconds?
The input drive is a Hydromotor with a displacement of 11.88 cu.inch per revolution.
What do you mean by "The input drive is a Hydromotor with a displacement of 11.88 cu.inch per revolution."?

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Old Mar 27th 2016, 11:27 AM   #3
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The flywheel is rotated with an axial piston hydraulic motor.
Hydraulic motor piston displacement is 11.88 cubic inch per revolution
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Old Mar 28th 2016, 04:57 AM   #4
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You asked how much torques is required to spin up the flywheel - this has absolutely nothing to do with what type of engine is used to create that torque.

The equation that governs torque and angular acceleration is T= I alpha, where T= torque applied, I = moment of inertia, and alpha = angular acceleration in radians per second squared. The angular acceleration here is equal to the final angular velocity (in rad/s) divided by the time it takes to reach that velocity. The final angular velocity in radians/second is 1500 RPM x 2 pi radian/rev x 1 min/60 sec. The only remaining trick to consider is that the value of 'I' that you gave is in lb_mass - ft^2, and once you do the math you will end up with torque in units of lb_mass - ft^2/s^2, which you will then have to convert to lb_force - ft by using the conversion 1 lb_force = 32.2 lb_m ft/s^2. I'll leave the math to you, but I suggest after you work this through you post back with your final result, and we'll be glad to check it for you.
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Old Mar 29th 2016, 06:32 PM   #5
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Thanks ChipB,

I worked out as you said and I got the final result as 5510 lb-ft. for 80 seconds.
Is it correct?
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Old Mar 30th 2016, 05:31 AM   #6
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No - not correct. Show me how you arrived at a value for alpha - I'm wondering if you made a mistake converting the final angular velocity from rev/min to rad/second.

Last edited by ChipB; Mar 30th 2016 at 02:03 PM.
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