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Old Sep 5th 2016, 02:27 PM   #11
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Again, only some of the points. I am doing this on the open Forum so others can follow the discussion. I do not generally discuss questions over the PM system.
Quite right too, though I have to admit I am having no small trouble 'following the discussion'

Instantonly,
Have you heard of Earnshaw's theorem?
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Old Sep 5th 2016, 03:30 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by studiot View Post
Quite right too, though I have to admit I am having no small trouble 'following the discussion'

Instantonly,
Have you heard of Earnshaw's theorem?
Rings a bell but I will have to review it. Will probably take the pressure off and give me another angle to clarify from. Thanks.
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Old Sep 5th 2016, 03:48 PM   #13
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Oooh! GOOD prod studiot. This should help significantly. May take a little while to re-absorb in context.


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Old Sep 5th 2016, 09:19 PM   #14
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I hope you don't figure out more questions till tomorrow. My brain is burning after all that verb conjugation!!!

:/
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Old Sep 7th 2016, 05:21 PM   #15
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One thing I wondered about- since you titled this "How many Planks in a point", how, exactly are you defining a physical "point"?
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Old Sep 7th 2016, 09:09 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by HallsofIvy View Post
One thing I wondered about- since you titled this "How many Planks in a point", how, exactly are you defining a physical "point"?
The title indicates that 'point' is an entirely anthropocentric concept. The only thing that even resembles a point in physics are termination vectors.

I think you will enjoy what I am about to post to the General Unity thread.

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Old Sep 8th 2016, 01:08 PM   #17
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Rings a bell but I will have to review it
Not Bell's theorem, Earnshaw's.

If it was a good question, how about a good reply?
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Old Sep 8th 2016, 01:20 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by studiot View Post
Not Bell's theorem, Earnshaw's.

If it was a good question, how about a good reply?
My apologies. I was distracted by devising a cold-fusion generator that draws no more current than a decent hi-fi system to provide experimental proof of gravity theory. I will provide a fuller analysis when I have finished my current hiatus from this subject. Turning Hz into words is maximally exhausting and can only be revived with significant time spent playing my guitar.

Incidentally, I am uncertain the reply you seek. You asked if I had heard of the theorem and I replied honestly.

Last edited by Instantonly; Sep 8th 2016 at 01:37 PM.
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