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Old Apr 1st 2014, 01:05 PM   #1
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Gravity and Anti-matter

You might find this to be an intriguing concept. The idea has been kicking about since the early 50's if I have my dates correct. Personally I don't agree with the idea that anti-matter is repulsed by ordinary matter but it would be fun if they did. (Note that the gravitational force between an electron and positron is swamped by the electromagnetic force so they can still collide if left on their own.)

-Dan
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Old Apr 2nd 2014, 04:24 AM   #2
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Interesting - I wouldn't have thought that this was seriously open to debate. I guess what they are doing is measuring the gravitational constant G as it applies to antimatter-matter attraction. Wouldn't it be interesting of it turns out to be 0 or negative - though I agree with you that I don't see why it would be different than "regular" G. If it does turn out to be different, then they'll have to figure a way to measure G for antimatter-antimatter, which I think would be incredibly difficult given the small amount of material they have to work with.
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Old Apr 2nd 2014, 09:55 AM   #3
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I am sure that somewhere I read a (short) article that indicated that at CERN,
(in a side chamber away from the main LHC)
they were combining anti-protons and positrons to create neutral atoms of anti-hydrogen.

One of the studies indicated for this anti-hydrogen was the response of these anti-atoms to the earths gravitational field.

I have no idea how sucsessful (or otherwise) these studies were.

(Is the gravitiational response of anti-matter dependent of the date?)

Last edited by MBW; Apr 2nd 2014 at 09:58 AM.
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Old Apr 2nd 2014, 12:54 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by MBW View Post
I am sure that somewhere I read a (short) article that indicated that at CERN,
(in a side chamber away from the main LHC)
they were combining anti-protons and positrons to create neutral atoms of anti-hydrogen.

One of the studies indicated for this anti-hydrogen was the response of these anti-atoms to the earths gravitational field.

I have no idea how sucsessful (or otherwise) these studies were.

(Is the gravitiational response of anti-matter dependent of the date?)
There have been a few experiments in the past that hinted of an anti-gravity effect, but if memory serves they couldn't repeat the results. As the article -states we need far more anti-hydrogen than they can create at the moment.

-Dan
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