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Old Aug 15th 2019, 09:38 AM   #1
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OK, but...

Your arguments are not daft,
however the philosophical leanings of most scientists would lead them to seek alternative explanations.

The "primitive" idea of the world was that the "Gods" dictated what happened and "we" just had to put up with it.

The renaissance idea was that the universe is a mechanism, that does what it does without either divine, or human, intervention.
Like a clock, it continues ticking regardless of if it is observed or not.

The quantum world seems to have bought back the "observer", but it is somewhat unclear about what constitutes "an observation"
Does an observation have to include a conscious appreciation of what is being observed?

The nature of the consciousness of the universe, and its connection with our own human consciousness, has been (and will continue to be) discussed many times over the years.
(especially when a group of students discover cannabis)
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Old Aug 15th 2019, 04:08 PM   #2
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Talking EM vs CRT

I read some materials about the double slits "experiment"/observed or unobserved once upon a time. It's funny and a bit cryptic.
When a guy is watching old style CRT TV, he observes particles of electron.
When the guy is watching electron microscope (EM), he observes electron wave.
If the guy watchs CRT TV with one eye while watchs EM with another eye, he observes particles and wave of electron at the same time.haha...a bit of joke.
I often say that time is a bit more complicated and secret than space. I put it aside temporarily.
Woody's words "Like a clock, it continues ticking regardless of if it is observed or not." is objective. Good.
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Old Aug 16th 2019, 02:28 AM   #3
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Yes, I agree with Woody. overall, it seems like the thoughts you have are a raw, unrefined aspect of modern science. Sure the aspects of observed vs unobserved elements are available in physics, but the experimentally validated theories probably don't play out exactly as you have in mind.

I think you'll make a lot of progress to refine your thinking if you learn quantum mechanics and particle physics in more detail. In those fields, the nature of observations (i.e. how you observe the system under investigation) is a key component, since interactions are a key element of those theories. It will also help you pick up the more standard terminology which is generally accepted in the literature.

For example, you state "Atoms normally shake around with thermal energy ..but not as much as quantum uncertainty makes them appear to be doing." However, if you calculate the typical uncertainty in position, $\displaystyle \Delta x$, for an orbital electron and the typical displacement for a vibrating molecule, you can compare them. You'll probably find that the latter will be the bigger displacement unless the temperature is extremely low.

You also state "I want to add that I think there is a good chance a black hole is a spherical gap in Spacetime with the unobservable quantum realm exposed. The event horizon is still spacetime, but inside that is quantum waves." but I'm pretty sure you just made that up. What do you mean by "quantum waves"? What do you mean by "spherical gap"? What's the difference between the "quantum realm" and the "normal realm"? It's easy to say the physics words, but much more difficult to come up with an original theory that not only solves existing problems, but has predictive power.

So yeah... keep studying the existing literature and you'll be probably be quite close to a stage when you can start plugging up the holes in your monologue. Then you'll be ready to hit the journal literature instead of the textbooks and start inventing new theories
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Old Aug 16th 2019, 05:42 AM   #4
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Talking xyz

Anyone come to PHF talk something, just one kick,...back to the classroom, authentic textbook, calculate xyz in Newton era. Perfect solution.
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Old Aug 16th 2019, 06:29 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by neila9876 View Post
Anyone come to PHF talk something, just one kick,...back to the classroom, authentic textbook, calculate xyz in Newton era. Perfect solution.
Yes, except for the Newton-era solution part... there's plenty of existing literature to study on modern, post-classical physics too. You should know both if they're both relevant for your work!

Also, the only reason this is usually the advice I give is because 99% of the people who come to this forum claiming to have new ideas haven't done their literature review (which can take anywhere from 2 -12 months depending on the scope of the work). Those who have done their homework presumably don't need to go to an internet forum to ask strangers for advice.

Believe it or not, it's very, very difficult to come up with new physics theories that are really good. It's a lot of work, which is why career physicists are a real job, not just some clever dudes chilling in a lab all day

That said, I do try to make my feedback constructive so no matter how good or bad the ideas are, the OP has something they can do to go back to their work (whatever it may be) and improve it.

Last edited by benit13; Aug 16th 2019 at 06:43 AM.
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Old Aug 16th 2019, 07:39 AM   #6
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Talking

The problem with the OP is what's the difference between a "funny" experiment and a "Nobel price" experiment (the SG experiment).
Actually, they are talking almost the same ****
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