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Old Jun 19th 2019, 07:32 PM   #1
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photon viewpoint

From the perspective of a photon, are all photons on top of each other in the same place?
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Old Jun 19th 2019, 10:00 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by wavesearcher View Post
From the perspective of a photon, are all photons on top of each other in the same place?
What do you mean "on top of each other"?

Now, particles traveling at the speed of light are a little tricky to talk about but I'll give you a quick rundown.

As an object goes faster and faster it "sees" the distance along its direction get smaller. This is the Fitzgerald contraction. As a result the faster the object goes the shorter the trip. (In the object's reference frame, of course.) We can take the limit of this idea as apply it to photons.... It takes a photon no time at all to get from one place to another. (wrt the reference frame on the photon.)

As far as a "pile up" is concerned the photons may not age at all between particles to interact with but there is nothing to say that they all arrive at the same time.

That's the best guess I can make. Does that answer your question or is it something else you were asking about?

-Dan
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Old Jun 19th 2019, 10:29 PM   #3
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length contraction

I was thinking that as any particle approaches the speed of light the length it measures in the direction of travel contracts so that at lightspeed it is zero. if we assume the wavefunction of the photon travels out in all directions and the length in each direction is zero then ...
In other words for a photon there is no time or space?
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Old Jun 20th 2019, 03:14 AM   #4
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Red face

@wavesearcher:
Ah, according to your derivation, a photon is similiar to a singurality... a singurality is something "between existence and nonexistence" or even "nonexistence" while even a pig know that photon is "existence"...no bad...
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Old Jun 20th 2019, 03:23 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by wavesearcher View Post
I was thinking that as any particle approaches the speed of light the length it measures in the direction of travel contracts so that at lightspeed it is zero. if we assume the wavefunction of the photon travels out in all directions and the length in each direction is zero then ...
In other words for a photon there is no time or space?
It's relative speed that matters, not the speed of the observer. Just because photons travel at speed c in a vacuum, it doesn't mean that all of their relative velocities are always c.
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Old Jun 20th 2019, 08:49 AM   #6
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relative speed

Yes but light travels at the same speed for all observers which means that from the viewpoint of the light all observers, planets, stars, spaceships, ect are moving towards it at the speed of light. Therefore the distance to all those places is zero.
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Old Jun 20th 2019, 08:55 AM   #7
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What is Distance?

The way photons "experience" distance and time has bothered me for a while.

A simple interpretation of the relativistic contractions would seem to indicate that
as measured by the photon that is mediating an interaction between two electrons,
there is no distance between the two electrons and the transfer is instant.

Even if the electrons are in different galaxies...
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Old Jun 20th 2019, 08:59 AM   #8
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photon distance

aha.. this is what I was thinking about.
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Old Jun 20th 2019, 09:18 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by wavesearcher View Post
Yes but light travels at the same speed for all observers which means that from the viewpoint of the light all observers, planets, stars, spaceships, ect are moving towards it at the speed of light. .
Why?

Last edited by benit13; Jun 20th 2019 at 09:30 AM.
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Old Jun 20th 2019, 10:59 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by benit13 View Post
Why?
One of the main principles of SR is that all observers measure the speed of light to be the same: c. So the relative speed between a photon's frame and any other (slower than c) will be c.

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