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Old Oct 19th 2016, 06:38 AM   #1
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Can we really touch objects?

What happens when we touch objects? Do electrons repel each other and therefore we can't literally touch objects?
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Old Oct 19th 2016, 07:31 AM   #2
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When you touch the surface of an object the protons in your skin are electrically repelled by the protons in the object, and you sense this as a force that prevents your finger from penetrating the surface. The nuclei of atoms in your skin never actually come in contact with the nuclei in the atoms of the object. Same thing when you cut material with a knife - the nuclei of the knife's atoms force their way between nuclei of the material, separating the atoms of the material through electrical repulsion forces without the nuclei ever actually coming in contact with each other.
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Old Oct 19th 2016, 07:35 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by ChipB View Post
When you touch the surface of an object the protons in your skin are electrically repelled by the protons in the object, and you sense this as a force that prevents your finger from penetrating the surface. The nuclei of atoms in your skin never actually come in contact with the nuclei in the atoms of the object. Same thing when you cut material with a knife - the nuclei of the knife's atoms force their way between nuclei of the material, separating the atoms of the material through electrical repulsion forces without the nuclei ever actually coming in contact with each other.
What about electromagnetic fields interacting eacother?
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Old Oct 19th 2016, 12:17 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Buket View Post
What about electromagnetic fields interacting eacother?
Nuclei repulsion? I had thought that "touch" was due to electron repulsion.

In any case, the charges repel via the electromagnetic fields. But I'm guessing that isn't the kind of answer you were looking for. What is the source of the fields you are thinking of?

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Old Oct 19th 2016, 08:06 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
Nuclei repulsion? I had thought that "touch" was due to electron repulsion.
-Dan
it of course is...

someone strong enough to fuse hydrogen under their fingertips would be... impressive
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Old Oct 20th 2016, 06:52 AM   #6
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So we encounter electron repulsion by each interaction with the surrounding environment. As its name suggests the Nuclei repulsion does not involve electrons, therefore humans cannot produce any.
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Old Oct 23rd 2016, 07:33 AM   #7
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Here is a video discussing about the touching process between objects:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=P0TNJrTlbBQ

What do you think about it?
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Old Oct 24th 2016, 12:16 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Buket View Post
What happens when we touch objects? Do electrons repel each other and therefore we can't literally touch objects?
What do you mean by "literally touch objects"? I would say that the electrons repelling one another is exactly what we mean by "touch"!
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Old Oct 24th 2016, 02:00 PM   #9
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Taking these arguments further, can any subatomic particles actually physically touch each other?
I believe that I have read (somewhere) that exponentially increasing repulsive forces always act to push subatomic particles apart as we try to push them together.
When CERN smashes protons together, do they actually touch?
Are the resultant "bits" that come flying out bits of broken proton?

I think that the situation is rather that a huge amount of energy has been concentrated into a tiny region of space, and (via E=mc^2) a plethora of new particles are created from this energy.
These are not bits of broken protons.

A similar argument applies to electrons, the amount of energy required to bring them closer together eventually becomes so huge that it gets into the range where it starts to create new particles.
Then you are into a scenario where "touching" is irrelevant.

Touching is (as he indicates in the video) the point at which the force pushing the items together matches the force pushing them apart.
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Old Oct 25th 2016, 04:48 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Woody View Post
Taking these arguments further, can any subatomic particles actually physically touch each other?
I believe that I have read (somewhere) that exponentially increasing repulsive forces always act to push subatomic particles apart as we try to push them together.
When CERN smashes protons together, do they actually touch?
Are the resultant "bits" that come flying out bits of broken proton?

I think that the situation is rather that a huge amount of energy has been concentrated into a tiny region of space, and (via E=mc^2) a plethora of new particles are created from this energy.
These are not bits of broken protons.

A similar argument applies to electrons, the amount of energy required to bring them closer together eventually becomes so huge that it gets into the range where it starts to create new particles.
Then you are into a scenario where "touching" is irrelevant.

Touching is (as he indicates in the video) the point at which the force pushing the items together matches the force pushing them apart.
I find Mr. Moriarty's explaining in the video logical..I guess you too..
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