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Old Apr 11th 2008, 10:58 AM   #1
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Common MKS and CGS units

The following pdf file is a list of common MKS and CGS units. I have generated the list myself, so if you find any errors or think I should add more, please let me know.

-Dan
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Common MKS and CGS units-common-units.pdf  
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Last edited by topsquark; Apr 17th 2008 at 01:03 PM.
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Old Apr 15th 2008, 06:10 PM   #2
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You can copy the missing ones from there : http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/units.html
Which is the website of the Système international (SI). And make them into a PDF.
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Old Aug 12th 2008, 01:45 PM   #3
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Hello,

A minor mistake : unit names must begin with a lower-case letter. (I admit that I often write "Kelvin" instead of "kelvin" too )
Originally Posted by www.BIPM.org
In English, the names of units start with a lower-case letter (even when the symbol for the unit begins with a capital letter), except at the beginning of a sentence or in capitalized material such as a title. In keeping with this rule, the correct spelling of the name of the unit with the symbol °C is "degree Celsius" (the unit degree begins with a lower-case d and the modifier Celsius begins with an upper-case C because it is a proper name).
(comes from BIPM - unit names)
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Old Aug 12th 2008, 04:35 PM   #4
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Hi flying squirrel!
Interesting. But is there an ambiguity because from "
the correct spelling of the name of the unit with the symbol °C is "degree Celsius" (the unit degree begins with a lower-case d and the modifier Celsius begins with an upper-case C because it is a proper name)
" I may consider "kelvin" as a proper name. Or not? Hmm, maybe not when we're talking about units... That's confusing, but nice to know.
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Old Aug 13th 2008, 02:57 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by arbolis View Post
Interesting. But is there an ambiguity because from "" I may consider "kelvin" as a proper name.
Yes, "Kelvin" is a proper name, but when it is used as a unit of temperature one has to write "kelvin" and not "Kelvin". If you use this word to refer to Mr. Kelvin then the letter k must be an upper-case letter. There is no ambiguity.
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Old Aug 13th 2008, 08:28 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by flyingsquirrel View Post
Hello,

A minor mistake : unit names must begin with a lower-case letter. (I admit that I often write "Kelvin" instead of "kelvin" too )

(comes from BIPM - unit names)
Interesting. I had not heard of this, but now that I think of it I have seen it done in the way that your article mentions. I have no idea if any of it is standard, though, nor when it became such. Thanks for the information!

However just for clarity, because I have seen many students err on this, the unit for force would be "newtons" and have the symbol "N." The unit symbol still contains a capital letter.

-Dan
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Old Jan 12th 2009, 11:41 AM   #7
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gud work dear.
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Old Jan 26th 2009, 11:38 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
Interesting. I had not heard of this, but now that I think of it I have seen it done in the way that your article mentions. I have no idea if any of it is standard, though, nor when it became such. Thanks for the information!

However just for clarity, because I have seen many students err on this, the unit for force would be "newtons" and have the symbol "N." The unit symbol still contains a capital letter.

-Dan
Convention for writing units and their symbols
1.Units are not written capital initial even if they are named after scientists. Eg. 'newton'.
2.The symbols of units named after scientists are in capital and other units are not in capital. Eg. symbol of newton is 'N' and of meter is 'm'.
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