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TeriStonefield Jan 27th 2013 10:35 AM

The Simplest Explanation: The Origins Of The Universe
 
The simpler the construction material is, in form and function, the wider range of formations it is capable of creating. For instance, LEGOS's are a much simpler and much more diverse construction tool, than television sets are. Similarly pixels can create an even greater variety of creations. By that same token, the Universe, the widest and most varied creation known to man, must be constructed of a material so ultimately simple that it approaches non-existence.

Mandrake Jan 29th 2013 08:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TeriStonefield (Post 19496)
The simpler the construction material is, in form and function, the wider range of formations it is capable of creating. For instance, LEGOS's are a much simpler and much more diverse construction tool, than television sets are. Similarly pixels can create an even greater variety of creations. By that same token, the Universe, the widest and most varied creation known to man, must be constructed of a material so ultimately simple that it approaches non-existence.

You mean like M-Theory one dimensional vibrating strings of Planck Scale length? Very simple, yet quite complex; very small, but nonetheless, existing. But I can think of a very simple origin of the Universe, which is not at all complex, and which approaches non-existence so closely that you may question whether it even really exist.
That concept is called 'Nothing".
A Universe from nothing which at the same time is everything.
Everything and Nothing...one and the same.
To borrow a line from a long ago movie, "In God, there is no Zero".
For philospophical ponderance only.

MBW May 24th 2013 03:36 PM

Probably Perhaps Possibly
 
The quantum world is full of probabilities, perhaps that is the reality.
The universe exists in that intermediate region between nothing and something.

jacksmith Jul 8th 2013 11:57 PM

The most popular theory of the origin of our universe centers in a cosmic cataclysm unmatched in the history of the Big Bang. This theory stems from the observation that other galaxies are moving away from ours at high speed in all directions, as if they had all been driven by an ancient explosive force.

MBW Jul 9th 2013 07:10 AM

Not the Copenhagen Interpretation
 
The big bang is an event of mind-boggling improbability...
Since then the universe has been moving along a favourable probability gradient through the manifold function of what is possible.
The final destination (heat death) is effectively Nothing
Which is far more probable than Anything...

Note that in this scenario the Schrodinger Equation quite literally defines the level of probability of existance.
The existance of an electron (for example) is literally non-local (rather than a local existance which is not known).
It is most likely to interact with another particle which has a probability of existance "close" to it,
but it may (at a lower probability) interact with another particle on the other side of the universe.

(Via a rather circular argument "close" means likely to interact, but then so does probablity of existing)

Note also that the term "particle" becomes a complete misnomer.

topsquark Jul 10th 2013 07:22 PM

"In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded." - Terry Pratchett

M-theory. Simple equations (to a PhD) in 11 dimensions (1 time, 10 space...containing 3 spatial (real), 1 time (imaginary), and 7 rolled up dimensions), one simple symmetry (which makes Einstein's General Relativity's 10 coupled non-linear, partial differential field theory equations look easy), with simple and easily understandable solutions (again to a PhD). Yeah, M-Theory really makes Particle Physics simple. (And sorry Dr. Kaku, but no experimental evidence for it no matter what you say on the Discovery Channel.)

I'm currently studying it. And I'm not happy...Just venting! :)

-Dan

octavixu Jul 11th 2013 01:34 PM

Today quantum physics become so unreal and mystic creating pure imaginary structures like strings and extra unseen dimensions. Once the physicists where clear thinkers, now they produce more nonsense than the so called "cranks".

topsquark Jul 12th 2013 08:45 AM

Simple is not necessarily "more correct" than complicated. Can you back up your comments with an example?

-Dan

Troll Aug 27th 2013 01:41 PM

Hmmm... How about a field that compresses space time at a single point to an infinite density and has no effect at an infinite distance. In both cases the result is non-existence, but in between, anything can happen.

topsquark Aug 27th 2013 07:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Troll (Post 21143)
Hmmm... How about a field that compresses space time at a single point to an infinite density and has no effect at an infinite distance. In both cases the result is non-existence, but in between, anything can happen.

Hmmmm... Classical Electrodynamics has a similar problem as far as a singularity is concerned and no one complains about that.

Note also that a gravitational singularity is a point of infinite density in space, not space-time.

And finally you are referring to a "classical" theory, not a quantum one. It may well be that, at the quantum level, there are no such things as singularities. We just don't yet know enough about a quantum theory of gravitation to say anything about the issue.

-Dan


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