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Old May 18th 2019, 09:49 AM   #1
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The Classical(relativity)/Quantum Divide has been solved Q ≤ 2D

The two sides of the coin run perfectly fine on their own. My point is that when we zoom into a large object, those atoms bonded together are not going to display quantum weirdness. If we separated a single atom from that object, I claim that atom has become 2D, but is 3D while we are observing it. So to unify, we can write an equation that says Relativity is 3D and QM is 2D or less.
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Old May 18th 2019, 11:43 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by pittsburghjoe View Post
The two sides of the coin run perfectly fine on their own. My point is that when we zoom into a large object, those atoms bonded together are not going to display quantum weirdness. If we separated a single atom from that object, I claim that atom has become 2D, but is 3D while we are observing it. So to unify, we can write an equation that says Relativity is 3D and QM is 2D or less.
Ignoring the question of a 2D atom, just what is the equation?

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Old May 18th 2019, 11:57 AM   #3
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They are 3D when we measure/observe ..not while they are in a superposition state. Their math might say they are always 3D ..but that's all they are during superposition ..math, saying they have a different dimensional number might explain why they are able to be in that state to begin with.

Q ≤ 2D is all I got
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Old May 18th 2019, 01:07 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by pittsburghjoe View Post
They are 3D when we measure/observe ..not while they are in a superposition state. Their math might say they are always 3D ..but that's all they are during superposition ..math, saying they have a different dimensional number might explain why they are able to be in that state to begin with.

Q ≤ 2D is all I got
The title says "The Classical(relativity)/Quantum Divide has been solved"

Why do you think that the superposition (which I would call an undetermined state) is 2D? I don't understand the problem you are trying to solve nor do I see how this solves anything?

I'm not trying to pick on you but I'm feeling like I don't know what you are getting at. What question are you saying this answers?

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Old May 18th 2019, 01:10 PM   #5
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It might be 0D, the point is that it isn't 3D. We can see 3D
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Old May 19th 2019, 08:21 AM   #6
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What if I told you the heisenberg uncertainty principle is due to the object being 2D?
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Old May 19th 2019, 08:32 AM   #7
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Evidence Required

There are many possibilities for alternative perspectives on these issues.
However it is impossible to comment properly on the simple bald statement you have posted
without some additional details.
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Old May 19th 2019, 09:10 AM   #8
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I'm talking about something so obvious that I'm embarrassed for the human race to have only noticed it now. We can't see particles while in superposition and we can't know their position and momentum at the same time. This points directly to an object that is existing outside of our normal 3D view. We don't see 2D objects in the real world.
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Old May 19th 2019, 10:27 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by pittsburghjoe View Post
I'm talking about something so obvious that I'm embarrassed for the human race to have only noticed it now. We can't see particles while in superposition and we can't know their position and momentum at the same time. This points directly to an object that is existing outside of our normal 3D view. We don't see 2D objects in the real world.
If atoms are 4D then we could also say that we can't see the atom if it has a different value of the 4th coordinate.

Without any evidence we can play this game with any number of dimensions. Science requires proof not simply speculation.

Thread closed.

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