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Old Dec 15th 2017, 09:45 AM   #1
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Is the Multiverse Infinite?

Last night I watched a TV documentary on the Multiverse.
In it the suggestion was made that in an infinite multiverse, there must inevitably be a universe which is identical to our own in every detail.

However, surely if it is identical in every detail, then it is our universe.

I would suggest that, if the universe(s) are individually finite, then there must be a finite number of ways of arranging the constituents of these universes before they start to repeat themselves.

If (as I suggest) a repeated universe cannot be claimed to be a different universe, then the multiverse must also be finite.
Huge in the extreme, but finite.
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Old Dec 15th 2017, 10:36 AM   #2
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The argument for an infinite multiverse may be similar to the argument for infinite space. If space is bounded by a wall, say, then what's behind the wall?

Personally I don't believe in the multiverse. In fact why do they stop there? Why not have multi-multiverses or even multi-multi-multiverses? Of course there is not a shred of evidence for them but is there any more for the standard multiverse?
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Old Dec 15th 2017, 11:07 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by kiwiheretic View Post
The argument for an infinite multiverse may be similar to the argument for infinite space. If space is bounded by a wall, say, then what's behind the wall?
"finite" does not necessarily mean "bounded". That depends upon the topology. The surface or a sphere, for example, has finite area but no boundary.

Personally I don't believe in the multiverse. In fact why do they stop there? Why not have multi-multiverses or even multi-multi-multiverses? Of course there is not a shred of evidence for them but is there any more for the standard multiverse?
I am not sure what you mean by "multi-multiverses".
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Old Dec 15th 2017, 11:48 AM   #4
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Isn't the whole idea of the multiverse just an elaborate way of getting around the "fine tuning" problem? (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fine-tuned_Universe)
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Old Dec 15th 2017, 04:56 PM   #5
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There are several different arguments that all lead to a Multiverse.
The fine tuning problem is just one of those.

I personally vacillate back and forth with my feelings about it.
It provides ways around several observed phenomena,
but it also brings with it its own baggage of issues.

The main scientific objection is that there is no way to experimentally prove (or disprove) the theory.

There have been suggestions that certain features observed in the cosmic microwave background could be caused by primordial quantum entanglements of the early universe with sibling universes, but that is far from being generally accepted.
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Old Dec 16th 2017, 02:10 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Woody View Post
Last night I watched a TV documentary on the Multiverse.
In it the suggestion was made that in an infinite multiverse, there must inevitably be a universe which is identical to our own in every detail.

However, surely if it is identical in every detail, then it is our universe.
I agree 100%. In fact so did Shroiedinger

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiverse
In Dublin in 1952, Erwin Schrödinger gave a lecture in which he jocularly warned his audience that what he was about to say might "seem lunatic". He said that, when his Nobel equations seemed to describe several different histories, these were "not alternatives, but all really happen simultaneously". That is earliest known reference to the multiverse.
There's a lot of good stuff in that page including the concept that the physical parameters vary throughout the universe.
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