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Old Nov 30th 2016, 03:24 PM   #1
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Scramble Theory

If you don't want someone to see something ..you scramble it.

This theory crosses the bridge between Einstein and Bohr. The math required to prove it will necessitate someone else as writing formulas is beyond my abilities. My hope is that you will read this and believe I am on to something and contribute.

QM weirdness sure is weird isn't it? So weird that it appears to be a sleight of hand. Well, what if it actually is? What if instead of being laughed at every time we try to do a quantum measurement, we treated it knowing it's a trick to begin with? Yes, this theory will likely fall into simulation territory or maybe that's just an easier way for us to understand it.

So here is the pitch: Quantum weirdness is a side effect of matter being scrambled. Scrambled on purpose to prevent intelligent lifeforms from fully understanding the framework to our world. Because with that knowledge we could potentially escape or destroy the simulation we are in.

What if anything capable of going into a superposition state moves along it's probability wave 10,000x faster than we realize due to freakish gravitational time dilation of the atomic scale? The free particle (one capable of superposition and is not being measured) is in such a timeline that can make it appear as though it is in two places at the same moment. We don't notice the hyper timeline (time dilation) at our scale (until now as I am pointing it out about the atomic scale).

I believe this will allow us to refine the probability wave formula as it currently is not taking into account this hyper timeline of the particle. A free particle is in it's wave state with the bulk of its essence wizzing around all the areas that a probability wave describes. The spots where the probability is high is analogous to the lanes that the bulk of the wave loops the most. It does this so incredibly fast that, to us, it can appear at two places at once. When the double slit experiment has the probability wave going through both slits ..the bulk of the wave actually does go through both at this hyper speed and can even interact with itself.

Spooky action at a distance can break general relativity because anything in superposition is a result of "god" scrambling the particle. Anything that can go into a superposition state does not have to follow the laws of physics.

I'm sure if their is a simulation creator, they are finding it quite humorous that we are creating Quantum computers using the side effect of their scramble technique.
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Old Nov 30th 2016, 04:18 PM   #2
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You bring up a number of points, but no definitions to go along with them. What does "scrambled," " freakish gravitational time dilation of the atomic scale," and "simulation territory" mean? I can make some guesses but it's better for you to define them for the sake of clarity.

And so far as I know the only particle that could possibly exist at two distinct points at the same time is a tachyon. Even the string theorists throw those solutions out.

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Old Nov 30th 2016, 06:27 PM   #3
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okay, "scrambled" is the cause for quantum weirdness that we observe. What purpose does Wave–particle duality serve matter? The famous double slit experiment shows us that we are not allowed to know the specifics of a particles wave function. Scrambling represents the code in our simulation that actively swaps a particle to it's wave state when not being observed. I also use it to explain why a particle in a box has no definite position. We have wondered for 100 years why quantum is so weird ..well, the simple answer is because that's they way it's coded in.

"freakish gravitational time dilation of the atomic scale" is a bit of stretch on my part. I needed to find a reason for the quantum wave function to be on a different timeline than the one we experience. We see unbelievable activity at the atomic scale, it just feels like it is a natural fit.

"simulation territory" = other simulation theories that are becoming popular

"And so far as I know the only particle that could possibly exist at two distinct points at the same time is a tachyon."

That's a first I'm hearing of this ..and don't believe that's correct. All I know is that it takes a particle to pass through a crystal to eventually duplicate itself and become entangled. Unless you are talking about how a particle can be in two places at the same time ..in which case, no, it can be any particle while it is in its superposition state. Tachyon is the particle known for going faster than light.

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Old Nov 30th 2016, 07:21 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by pittsburghjoe View Post
okay, "scrambled" is the cause for quantum weirdness that we observe. What purpose does Wave–particle duality serve matter? The famous double slit experiment shows us that we are not allowed to know the specifics of a particles wave function. Scrambling represents the code in our simulation that actively swaps a particle to it's wave state when not being observed. I also use it to explain why a particle in a box has no definite position. We have wondered for 100 years why quantum is so weird ..well, the simple answer is because that's they way it's coded in.
"The most incomprehensible thing about the Universe is that it is comprehensible." - Albert Einstein

Quantum Physics is only as weird as our experiences. If we lived on a daily basis with it the "scrambled" would be commonplace and we'd have little or no trouble with it. From this point of view it is the everyday "ordinary" world that is weird.

"freakish gravitational time dilation of the atomic scale" is a bit of stretch on my part. I needed to find a reason for the quantum wave function to be on a different timeline than the one we experience. We see unbelievable activity at the atomic scale, it just feels like it is a natural fit.
I'm going to object to this terminology, though not necessarily what you are trying to say about it. (At least, not yet.) Gravity creates different time dilation effects at different points in space-time. It is a term already in use and I don't see how it has anything to do with what you are trying to talk about.

"simulation territory" = other simulation theories that are becoming popular
Okay.

"And so far as I know the only particle that could possibly exist at two distinct points at the same time is a tachyon."

That's a first I'm hearing of this ..and don't believe that's correct. All I know is that it takes a particle to pass through a crystal to eventually duplicate itself and become entangled.
Quantum Physics views the world as a series of fields interacting. These fields stretch across the Universe and are essentially always there, though the field strengths vary over time. Probably the more pertinent way to look at it for you is that the wavefunction can be at more than one place at any given time but the particle representing it can't. Unless it travels faster than light speed...our detectors would detect such a particle to be in more than one place at one time. We call FTL particles tachyons and none have been observed and no one expects them to.
==============================================

I'm not much of a Philosopher but now we can talk a bit. I see no reason why the scrambled nature of Quantum Theory has to lead to the idea of some over-arching being trying to make us all scratch our heads to understand the world. I will agree that at least one such level of being exists (I'm a Christian) but I don't understand the scrambling. If there were a being with such power and temperment then why would it (they) worry about us learning a few things? They would be so far ahead of us that we, as a race, would probably never even get close to their level of knowledge anyway.



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Old Nov 30th 2016, 08:18 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
"The most incomprehensible thing about the Universe is that it is comprehensible." - Albert Einstein
and yet, he went to the grave unable to comprehend how to unify QM with classical :/


Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
Quantum Physics is only as weird as our experiences. If we lived on a daily basis with it the "scrambled" would be commonplace and we'd have little or no trouble with it. From this point of view it is the everyday "ordinary" world that is weird.
huh? All this weirdness only happens at the atomic scale. I'm supplying the reason for it.

Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
I'm going to object to this terminology, though not necessarily what you are trying to say about it. (At least, not yet.) Gravity creates different time dilation effects at different points in space-time. It is a term already in use and I don't see how it has anything to do with what you are trying to talk about.
Yes, I know gravitational time dilation is a real thing. It's partially how I am marring QM with classical. Einstein tells us that someone will age a couple micro seconds slower that lives on the top floor of a building than someone on the bottom floor. I am saying that when you scale it down to atomic scale that multiplies this effect and makes free particles "age" much faster.

Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
Quantum Physics views the world as a series of fields interacting. These fields stretch across the Universe and are essentially always there, though the field strengths vary over time. Probably the more pertinent way to look at it for you is that the wavefunction can be at more than one place at any given time but the particle representing it can't. Unless it travels faster than light speed...our detectors would detect such a particle to be in more than one place at one time. We call FTL particles tachyons and none have been observed and no one expects them to.
You are getting tripped up with observed/measured particles. I am only talking about when they are in their probability wave form. QM likes to say they are both at the same time ..but I believe they morph to be one (state) to the other dependent on observation.

==============================================

Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
I'm not much of a Philosopher but now we can talk a bit. I see no reason why the scrambled nature of Quantum Theory has to lead to the idea of some over-arching being trying to make us all scratch our heads to understand the world. I will agree that at least one such level of being exists (I'm a Christian) but I don't understand the scrambling. If there were a being with such power and temperment then why would it (they) worry about us learning a few things? They would be so far ahead of us that we, as a race, would probably never even get close to their level of knowledge anyway.
Well, for all we know, the Christian God could be the simulation writer and Jesus was code hacked into our simulation. You can't fathom why God wouldn't want us having root knowledge of our world? We could escape this world he created for us ..or destroy it.
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Old Nov 30th 2016, 08:26 PM   #6
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Ummmm...We'd better focus on this: You can't unify Classical and Quantum Physics in the sense you seem to be implying. The basic underlying theme of Physics is that Classical Physics needs to be derivable from Quantum theory...ie. the limit as $\displaystyle \hbar \to 0$. You do realize that Classical theories are inherently flawed, don't you?

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Old Nov 30th 2016, 09:29 PM   #7
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Classical is flawed? You are saying General Relativity isn't correct?

It is unifying because I'm saying QM is derivable from Classical. Scrambling answers the weirdness.

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Old Dec 1st 2016, 01:01 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by pittsburghjoe View Post
Classical is flawed? You are saying General Relativity isn't correct?

It is unifying because I'm saying QM is derivable from Classical. Scrambling answers the weirdness.
You have it backward. Yes, all Classical theories are (theoretically) derivable from Quantum theories. That being said it's going to be a long long while before anyone can use QED to do EM calculations on a macroscopic scale. It'll never happen, really...the calculations involved are hideous. The point is that QED is the basic unit and Maxwell's equations should be predicable from it. etc. for other theories.

And yes, that also goes for GR. GR falls apart on the Quantum scale. The theory that's going to replace it is called "Quantum Gravity" but we only have the barest of outlines of it for now.

-Dan
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Old Dec 12th 2016, 11:59 AM   #9
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I've updated my theory, hold onto your hat.

I think I stumbled onto the answer for Quantum weirdness

Like it or not, the double slit experiment seems to demonstrate that our physical world grows from each of our consciousnesses.



One study has shown that the on/off switch for consciousnesses may reside in or around the Claustrum in the brain.
https://www.newscientist.com/article...deep-in-brain/

It is this area of the brain that I purpose we first search for particles in superposition/entangled states. If we were to find such a thing, it could prove that our consciousnesses is being sent to our brains via entanglement.

All quantum weirdness would then have a reason for being the way it is ..it's necessary in order for lifeforms to have a conscious.
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Old Dec 12th 2016, 02:25 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by pittsburghjoe View Post
I've updated my theory, hold onto your hat.

I think I stumbled onto the answer for Quantum weirdness

Like it or not, the double slit experiment seems to demonstrate that our physical world grows from each of our consciousnesses.



One study has shown that the on/off switch for consciousnesses may reside in or around the Claustrum in the brain.
https://www.newscientist.com/article...deep-in-brain/

It is this area of the brain that I purpose we first search for particles in superposition/entangled states. If we were to find such a thing, it could prove that our consciousnesses is being sent to our brains via entanglement.

All quantum weirdness would then have a reason for being the way it is ..it's necessary in order for lifeforms to have a conscious.
I"m afraid that it breaks down at step one. Yes we can only say what a particle is/does by observing. But that doesn't mean they only interact when we observe them. No one is observing the inside of your computer but clearly it works anyway.

There is some level of truth in step one, though. There is the deep question of what identifies a "quantum observer." Just what is it the collapses the wavefunction? I highly suspect that it doesn't require a conscious observer...two systems can interact via a force, gravity, EM, etc. The interaction between different systems may be enough to qualify as an observer. Of course, we don't know what's going on until we observe it, but that's just piling observer on observer.

I have to say, though, that "quantum weirdness" isn't weird. The weirdness comes in because we don't directly observe many quantum effects in the macroscopic world. We are used to that, but the Universe operates differently than what we observe on an everyday basis. It's just how the Universe really operates. It's a bit confusing to say the least but beyond why these rules exist this is not really a special question: If we take Classical Physics as the way the world operates we need to explain how that works too. But so far there is no scientific reason why there is a need for a religion to explain it.

-Dan
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