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Old May 26th 2011, 03:31 AM   #1
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practical application of lambert's law with hydrogen gas

I'm designing a device i can use to count hydrogen molecules using Lambert's law. Can anybody point me in the direction of a good resource where i can get tabulated data on the absorption co-efficient of Hydrogen gas at different frequencies.
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Old May 29th 2011, 04:37 AM   #2
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pretty please
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Old May 29th 2011, 10:08 AM   #3
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From what i understand, you could find the frequency of any of the emission lines of hydrogen and use that as your source. It is bound to get absorbed. Is it necessary to have a range of frequencies? That would mean more detectors.
And how exactly would you relate the number of molecules to the intensity?
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Old May 29th 2011, 11:31 AM   #4
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It's my grand and mighty plan to measure temperature and pressure as well. Then using the ideal gas equation i can figure out how many gas molecules there are per unit volume.

From lambert's equation i'll have both intensities, hopefully the absorption co-efficient for the relevant wavelength and the path length so it will be easy to calculate the number of hydrogen molecules per unit volume.

That's it really. I'll output the purity as a fraction.

I've been doing a bit of reading up on the absorption spectrum of hygrogen gas and it looks like it is pretty transparent to anything not severely UV, like 112nm ish and shorter. That's no good really because i cant get a light source that'll work.

The hydrogen i'll be working with is relatively pure and the most likely contaminant is normal air so i'm planning to use a 568nm led so i can look for nitrogen. I'm not sure what else absorbs well at that wavelength but i know nitrogen is pretty opaque.

So that means what i need is some data on the absorption coefficient of Nitrogen at that wavelength. Data for oxygen would also be useful.
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absorption, application, gas, hydrogen, lambert, lambert's law, law, practical



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