Go Back   Physics Help Forum > College/University Physics Help > Nuclear and Particle Physics

Nuclear and Particle Physics Nuclear and Particle Physics Help Forum

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old Jun 12th 2008, 09:54 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: HK
Posts: 886
Particles

We are taught that no for gases, the particles(molecules) are constantly vibrating so that it is said to possess average kinetic energy.
During vibrations, would there be any energy loss?

If yes, is energy lost in form of radiation?
werehk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 12th 2008, 11:24 AM   #2
Forum Admin
 
topsquark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: On the dance floor, baby!
Posts: 2,781
Originally Posted by werehk View Post
We are taught that no for gases, the particles(molecules) are constantly vibrating so that it is said to possess average kinetic energy.
During vibrations, would there be any energy loss?

If yes, is energy lost in form of radiation?
Energy is not typically lost through vibration (as far as I know) but it is lost in collisions with other molecules either in the gas itself or the container. The vibrations are due to electromagnetic forces which are conservative and thus there is no energy loss.

-Dan
__________________
Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.

See the forum rules here.
topsquark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 12th 2008, 08:33 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: HK
Posts: 886
Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
Energy is not typically lost through vibration (as far as I know) but it is lost in collisions with other molecules either in the gas itself or the container. The vibrations are due to electromagnetic forces which are conservative and thus there is no energy loss.

For vibrations due to electromagnetic forces, would the gravity of earth affect the conservative property which hence causes loss in energy?
werehk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 13th 2008, 03:35 AM   #4
Forum Admin
 
topsquark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: On the dance floor, baby!
Posts: 2,781
Originally Posted by werehk View Post
For vibrations due to electromagnetic forces, would the gravity of earth affect the conservative property which hence causes loss in energy?
Now that you mention gravity, the vibrations should technically give off gravitational waves, but the effect would be too small to measure. This has nothing to do with the Earth's gravitation though. The Earth's gravity would tend to pull all the molecules down, so if the gas were free to act it would technically get hotter since the kinetic energy of the molecules would increase as they dropped. And in any event the gravitational force is also conservative so there is no energy loss there either. Presumably when the particles fall far enough to interact with the Earth's surface, any energy lost by the gas to accelerate the Earth will be given back.

-Dan
__________________
Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.

See the forum rules here.
topsquark is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

  Physics Help Forum > College/University Physics Help > Nuclear and Particle Physics

Tags
particles


« Experiment? | Decay »

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Physics Forum Discussions
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
fluid particles oscarlai1114 Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 3 Oct 24th 2013 01:10 PM
Two particles hakimghaziali2 Advanced Mechanics 9 Jul 15th 2013 06:46 PM
[SOLVED] Particles!!! Please Help! olyviab Quantum Physics 1 Apr 1st 2010 03:01 PM
anti-particles Bruce Burrows Theoretical Physics 1 Feb 22nd 2010 12:37 AM
Diffraction of particles Naur Waves and Sound 4 Jul 12th 2008 06:21 PM


Facebook Twitter Google+ RSS Feed