Go Back   Physics Help Forum > College/University Physics Help > Nuclear and Particle Physics

Nuclear and Particle Physics Nuclear and Particle Physics Help Forum

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old Oct 1st 2019, 05:23 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
muon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: low nuclear orbit
Posts: 20
Electroweak Bosons

Have the W1, W2, W3, and B bosons ever been observed? It's my understanding that at energies above 246 GeV they mediate the electroweak force. However if they've never been observed, then why is it always stated that all fundamental particles in the Standard Model have been observed other than the graviton?
muon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 1st 2019, 08:04 AM   #2
Forum Admin
 
topsquark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: On the dance floor, baby!
Posts: 2,857
Originally Posted by muon View Post
Have the W1, W2, W3, and B bosons ever been observed? It's my understanding that at energies above 246 GeV they mediate the electroweak force. However if they've never been observed, then why is it always stated that all fundamental particles in the Standard Model have been observed other than the graviton?
You've got the right bosons, but they are from before the Universe underwent what is effectively a change in phase. (Electroweak symmetry breaking is the official term.) The W1, W2, W3, and B particles became the W+, W-, Z0, and the photon, all of what have been observed. If we ramp up the energy of the collisions we should be able to find the three W's and the B but that's beyond the abilities of the current generation of synchrotons. (The Higgs was found a couple of years ago which is a big step in confirming these particles' existence.)

-Dan
__________________
Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.

See the forum rules here.
topsquark is online now   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 1st 2019, 01:57 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
muon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: low nuclear orbit
Posts: 20
In that case they really shouldn't say that they've observed all the particles of the Standard Model, imo
muon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 1st 2019, 02:07 PM   #4
Forum Admin
 
topsquark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: On the dance floor, baby!
Posts: 2,857
Originally Posted by muon View Post
In that case they really shouldn't say that they've observed all the particles of the Standard Model, imo
I agree. The derivation of the Electoweak system makes their existence necessary but we need to have a way to detect them in a region where the symmetry has not been broken.. at very high energies. As attractive the theory is (I'm a theorist) it needs more experimental evidence.

-Dan
__________________
Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.

See the forum rules here.
topsquark is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

  Physics Help Forum > College/University Physics Help > Nuclear and Particle Physics

Tags
bosons, electroweak



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Physics Forum Discussions
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Why can we separately consider strong and electroweak physics? ndung Quantum Physics 8 Feb 21st 2015 04:01 PM
Where do guage bosons come from? kiwiheretic Quantum Physics 0 Mar 8th 2014 10:16 PM
Aplication of the harmonic oscillator to an arbitrary number of free bosons milagros77 Quantum Physics 1 Mar 24th 2009 10:17 AM


Facebook Twitter Google+ RSS Feed