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Old Aug 18th 2014, 07:04 AM   #1
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Does Space contain nuclear particles everywhere?

If Space contains nuclear particles everywhere, then would it be safer to build a nuclear power station in space to provide energy into earth? if we can transfer energy long distance between station and Earth.

Furthermore, we can do a lot of nuclear experience in space too.

Does anyone have any suggestions?
Thanks in advance for any suggestions
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Old Aug 18th 2014, 07:30 AM   #2
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More practical than nuclear power plants in space would be power sources that work off solar energy. The problem is how to transfer energy from a power plant in space to Earth. One possibility would be microwave transmission, but there are huge technical and safety issues. Microwave transmission systems have been demonstrated that carry power in the range of tens of kilowatts - about enough to power one home. Clearly much work is needed to increase the capability in order to carry megawatts of power. There would be significant safety issues with such a system - consider what would happen if birds, or airplanes, wander into the path of the beam.
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Old Aug 18th 2014, 07:51 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by ChipB View Post
One possibility would be microwave transmission, but there are huge technical and safety issues. Microwave transmission systems have been demonstrated that carry power in the range of tens of kilowatts - about enough to power one home. Clearly much work is needed to increase the capability in order to carry megawatts of power. There would be significant safety issues with such a system - consider what would happen if birds, or airplanes, wander into the path of the beam.
Would it be possible on using ionosphere to distribute microwave transmission to every countries, since we already using ionosphere for transferring signals.

Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions :>
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Old Aug 18th 2014, 08:33 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by oem7110 View Post
Would it be possible on using ionosphere to distribute microwave transmission to every countries, since we already using ionosphere for transferring signals.
Shortwave radio does indeed bounce off the ionosphere. but the power in such radio waves is too small to be practical for energy transmission. And it would be impossible to steer the radio waves in the correct direction of a receiver - recall that this effect is for broadcast radio. So a source putting out tens of kilowatts of energy in radio waves is reduced to microwatts at the receiver (the antenna of your short wave radio).
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Old Aug 18th 2014, 05:20 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by ChipB View Post
Shortwave radio does indeed bounce off the ionosphere. but the power in such radio waves is too small to be practical for energy transmission. And it would be impossible to steer the radio waves in the correct direction of a receiver - recall that this effect is for broadcast radio. So a source putting out tens of kilowatts of energy in radio waves is reduced to microwatts at the receiver (the antenna of your short wave radio).
Microwave transmission would not be the right selection for transferring energy between station and Earth, in fact, somehow, we indirectly receive energy from Sun, which is a largest nuclear station. We need a more efficient devices to receive energy from Sun instead.

Do you have any idea on other existing technology to transfer energy?
Thanks you very much for any suggestions
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Old Aug 19th 2014, 06:23 AM   #6
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Arthur C Clarke probably came up with the most plausible nearish future scenario with his tethered geosyncronous satellites.

Given a strong enough (conducting) tether, it is theoretically possible to have a string of power satellites around the equator (like a giant circus ride).

The new isomers of carbon currently being developed (nested nano-tubes, graphene, ...) are starting to offer the sort of extreme qualities that such a tether would require.

So technically ridiculously challenging, but theoretically not totally impossible.
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