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Garonoius Aug 23rd 2017 10:31 PM

Salutations to one and all
 
I live in (mostly) sunny Sydney, Australia, I have a slight background in Astrophysics/Astrophotonics, and briefly worked at the CSIRO. I am qualified as an Electrical Engineer, with most of my electronics experience in analogue technology; primarily hollow-state.

I have an interest in space-craft technology, and in alternate/exotic propellants, especially storage and new rocket engine design, thereof.

Regards, Gary

mash Aug 24th 2017 07:12 AM

Hi Gary, welcome to PHF!

I spent some time in Australia once. Beautiful country.

Look forward to having you join the community!

Pmb Aug 24th 2017 07:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Garonoius (Post 36716)
I live in (mostly) sunny Sydney, Australia, I have a slight background in Astrophysics/Astrophotonics, and briefly worked at the CSIRO. I am qualified as an Electrical Engineer, with most of my electronics experience in analogue technology; primarily hollow-state.

I have an interest in space-craft technology, and in alternate/exotic propellants, especially storage and new rocket engine design, thereof.

Regards, Gary

Welcome! Always good to see new folks join!

I was quite interested to see that your interests like in spacecraft technology, rocket engine design and propellants. Being a child of the Apollo era I too have always been interested these subjects. I've also been interested in constructing my own model rockets using liquid fuel rather than solid propellants.

kiwiheretic Aug 24th 2017 11:06 AM

Welcome Garonoius

Good to see someone else from the southern hemisphere here. Thought I was the only one :D

Garonoius Aug 24th 2017 09:00 PM

Thank you guys, for the welcome. I was born in '68, so I caught the moon landing, just!

A couple of years ago I (unfortunately) withdrew from a part-time PhD at the Sydney Institute for Astronomy, in a field known as Astrophotonics. I've been considering re-applying, with an interest in "second generation" rocket technology, and have been doing some very basic research and modelling of exotic propellants, with this in mind. Unfortunately I have little knowledge of particle physics, and fluid mechanics, but have been attempting to brush up on electrostatics/electrodynamics. Currently I'm attempting a feasibility study of the confinement of bulk hydrogen ions (~10^30 ions). The challenge is knowing where to put time and effort into often dry subject matter (pun, sorry). I'm not naturally academic, so it is a wee challenge!!!

Woody Aug 25th 2017 03:31 AM

Confinement of Hydrogen Ions,
Sounds very much like what they (try to) do in Fusion Reactors
although, I guess, without the Hugely High Temperatures.

ps
Hello and Welcome

Garonoius Aug 25th 2017 07:17 PM

Yes Woody; I've been leaning toward studying the various confinement systems in these fusion-hopeful systems. As you suggested, they want it hot, but I want it cold. They currently achieve about 2x10^20 plasma-particles/m^3, with relatively massive magnets and coils etc, I need about 10^29 ions/m^3, in a lightweight system; easy see! The predicted force between ions is huge. One can see why no one is attempting to employ H+ ions as a rocket fuel, but the energy mass-density of the (H+) + (e-) reaction is about 120 times that of the combustion of hydrogen and oxygen, and it may have its place in yet undefined applications. Though metallic hydrogen may turn out to be a lot more practical ;-)

kiwiheretic Aug 26th 2017 01:21 PM

ok, I googled it and found this: Astrophotonics at the University of Sydney - Research/SIfA/Astrophotonics - The University of Sydney

There's not even a wiki page for it, must be quite a new field.

Pmb Aug 26th 2017 02:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Woody (Post 36750)
Confinement of Hydrogen Ions,
Sounds very much like what they (try to) do in Fusion Reactors
although, I guess, without the Hugely High Temperatures.

ps
Hello and Welcome

You might be thinking of the fusion of Hydrogen to into helium where he might be thinking ion propulsion using electrostatic fields to accelerate the ions.

Woody Aug 26th 2017 04:18 PM

I guess "cold" protons would require substantially less power to confine electromagnetically,
but I still suspect that the amount of power required to maintain the confinement would greatly out weigh any increased energy density advantages you might gain.

I can't think of any purely physical means of confining protons.


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