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Old May 31st 2017, 07:24 AM   #1
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Talking I have one question

Hi guys,

I'm a Biologist and I was discussing something with my brother who is in Culinary Art.

Cooking is very much a Science so here's the problem that needs to be solved.

My brother's chocolate lava cake is the bestseller at the restaurant he part-times at. I came up with the idea to adapt it to make it erupt like a volcano. He wants to apply this in a fine-dining concept.

Now, I have thought about using dry ice but it's messy, it will bubble and foam and at the end it's just a mess to look at so that is not going to work. It's got to be a presentable, elegant solution that works and is relatively easy to work on so that it can be easily handled in the kitchen production line.

My brother is convinced that physically pushing it out is the only way as cakes tend to have air pockets and any form of "food chemistry" like CO2 will just bubble or escape and will not produce a proper eruption. He said that would be difficult to do and also will not look nice when delivering it to the customers. Anyone has any other viable ideas?

Hoping to see some really creative ideas here. XD Thanks in advance.
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Old Jun 1st 2017, 09:03 AM   #2
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If I remember correctly, a "chocolate lava cake" is a chocolate cake with a hot chocolate sauce center. I don't think I would set it up so that the chocolate sauce started coming out after it was served. Instead, just before serving, break a small hole in the top and pour additional hot chocolate sauce over the cake.
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Old Jun 1st 2017, 01:10 PM   #3
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You could probably get the effect by injecting baking soda into the liquid centre just before serving, but that would probably adversely affect the taste.
Might "popping candy" work?
Watch out though for health and safety,
hot splashes of chocolate in your customers eyes might not be welcome...

I am sure I saw a TV program where Heston Blumenthal did something similar,
unfortunately my memory is not good enough to remember the method he used,
A trawl through old BBC programs might find it.
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Old Jun 1st 2017, 01:22 PM   #4
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Could you make small jelly beads by dipping (tiny) solid CO2 balls in gelatin?
If the jelly is stretchy enough these will expand as little jelly balloons
pushing out the chocolate, but keeping the CO2 from expanding explosively.

Very fiddly, not sure the jelly would stretch suitably,
but might be a fun idea to play with.

What would happen if you made some champagne sorbet beads coated in jelly?
How could you introduce these into the cake before serving?
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Old Jun 1st 2017, 07:49 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by lynn1992 View Post
....
My brother is convinced that physically pushing it out is the only way as cakes tend to have air pockets and any form of "food chemistry" like CO2 will just bubble or escape and will not produce a proper eruption. He said that would be difficult to do and also will not look nice when delivering it to the customers. .
I think your brother's got the right idea ....dry ice is not easily storable , producing CO2 by reaction is problematic and unpredictable...

I'm thinking a large syringe containing red coloured thick fluid , a flexible tube connects from the syringe to the point of exit , you could have an electric motor system pushing the plunger to make delivery smooth and automatic ..
Another way would be to have a syringe like plastic bag , the fluid is pushed out by CO2 , some baking soda and lemon juice already in the bag at one end ,you break a capsule of lemon juice by pushing on the bag to start the reaction.

There's probably no easy solution , otherwise someone would already have done it.
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