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Old May 6th 2017, 02:39 AM   #1
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Anyone who made self-education?

Hello again. This forum's members seem to be friendly and helpful, so I would like to get some friends here.

Any people here, who managed to study quantum mechanics and special relativity by their own, not in the university? How much time and efforts did it take?
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Old May 7th 2017, 04:33 PM   #2
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That would be me. I studied those topics purely at the university of youtube and the help of this forum. It is not hard to get up to speed with the essence of those subjects without a lot of onerous math. Of course it would take a lot longer to get to grips with all the nitty gritty details. By essence I mean familiarise oneself with the important experiments that took place and their significance and to become aware of the controversies around them.
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Old May 8th 2017, 11:17 AM   #3
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Nice to see there is someone who's interested it those things, like me
I watched many popular videos, too. I understood basic principles, but I want to understand the origin of formulas. Like Lorenz transformation or Shcredinger's formula. But my math knowledge is too weak. Have you tried to sort them out?
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Old May 8th 2017, 05:51 PM   #4
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I watched professor susskind's youtube videos on special relativity. He explains it fairly gently:



The lorentz transformation is simply a getting to grips with the speed of light being the same for every observer. From that they deduced that clocks must slow down for moving observers and lengths must contract.

For relativity I enjoyed Eugene Khytoransky's videos:




Also a very basic layman's "derivation" of schrodinger's equation



It's a short video and very basic. However many people say schrodinger's equation was not derived but only motivated. I think that means it was never theoretically proven but simply guessed at and it appears to agree with experiment.

Hope that helps you get up to speed quickly.

Enjoy :-)
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Old May 9th 2017, 01:26 AM   #5
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Thanks
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Old May 11th 2017, 05:13 AM   #6
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The difficulty with "self education" is knowing if you have actually learned since you do not have an outside party checking you.
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Old May 11th 2017, 11:58 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by HallsofIvy View Post
The difficulty with "self education" is knowing if you have actually learned since you do not have an outside party checking you.
Yes, it is. So, what can be a solution? Sets of tests, or?
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Old May 12th 2017, 08:22 AM   #8
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mutts

i'm self educated, and ridiculed for it on forums. i have altzhiemers and persue many avenues of learning to ward off it's effects. in truth, science and physics are based on mathematics, a very exact study; so expect corrections in language and grammar which also has to be exact.

i have watched and contributed to the physics stack exchange, another forum, and found them to be a cut and dried stick to the facts group that are not only elitist, but condescending. things haven't changed much since einstein, or before.

note that educational systems teach you to think inside the box, but the great discoveries are made by people who think outside the box. acceptance of ideas is based largely on credentials, not intelligence. in any case, be ready to argue your point.
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Old May 12th 2017, 12:20 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by mattlock View Post
note that educational systems teach you to think inside the box, but the great discoveries are made by people who think outside the box.
I absolutely agree with you.

But there is an obstacle for me. To create any significant physical theory, one must have a solid knowledge of math. But my math skills are rather weak. I would like to know if it can be fixed with self education.
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Old May 12th 2017, 01:27 PM   #10
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Some of the more high profiling physics forums refuse to discuss alternative theories and are very quick to label you as a crackpot before they push the ban button. I guess that's their right as they are the ones running those forums but it does tend to promote traditional views rather than anything ground breaking, even in principle. I personally find it more invigorating to discuss well presented new views even if most of them are later shown to be wrong.
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