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Old Sep 20th 2018, 07:49 PM   #1
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Question Question on the perception of color.

Below is a diagram as to how I understand light and its behavior in the physical world at a rudimentary level. My question is whether we interpret the absence of a wavelength as a certain color, the solitude of a wavelength as the color, or both.



If you emit white light at a "green" object, my understanding is that it will absorb the green light and reflect everything else. That is why if you shine a green light on a green object, it will appear as black, since little to no light is reflecting. However, we can interpret the emission of that green light as green, where the sole present wavelength is the green wavelength, but we still understand it as the same color. It may be as simple as "both are true" but I'm curious if there's something I'm missing or not.
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Old Sep 20th 2018, 09:59 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Bluvarth View Post
If you emit white light at a "green" object, my understanding is that it will absorb the green light and reflect everything else. That is why if you shine a green light on a green object, it will appear as black. ...
That's not quiet correct ...if you shine white light on a green object it will reflect the green , that's why it appears green ...it will absorb the other frequencies .

Shining green light on a green object it will appear green
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Old Sep 21st 2018, 02:36 AM   #3
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the absence of light can be called black or darkness.

but this is not the case for white light, which breaks down into the seven colors passing through a prism.

you shine a certain colored wavelength of light, it is as straightforward as, as projecting the same color you expect it.
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Old Sep 21st 2018, 06:55 AM   #4
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Note that the "seven" colours are a human invented convention.
There is actually a continuous spectrum of colour.

I believe that it was Newton who chose seven colours
and this was more because he believed 7 is an "auspicious" number
rather than that he thought he could see 7 colours.
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Old Sep 21st 2018, 01:06 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by oz93666 View Post
That's not quiet correct ...if you shine white light on a green object it will reflect the green , that's why it appears green ...it will absorb the other frequencies .

Shining green light on a green object it will appear green
Thinking back this makes a lot more sense than I want to admit. For some reason I'd thought that they absorbed their respective color, thanks for the response though, it solved my conundrum.
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