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-   -   Can any invisible EM waves that get absorbed by electrons pass through solid matter.? (http://physicshelpforum.com/light-optics/11870-can-any-invisible-em-waves-get-absorbed-electrons-pass-through-solid-matter.html)

noabsortion1 Apr 26th 2016 08:09 PM

Can any invisible EM waves that get absorbed by electrons pass through solid matter.?
 
Can any invisible EM waves that get absorbed by electrons pass through solid matter.?
Can any invisible EM waves that get absorbed by electrons pass through solid matter.
Question 1. If you mixed any invisible EM waves, like X-rays , gamma waves, ultraviolet waves ,and micro waves with radio waves, and sent the invisible EM waves in microscopic bundles with the original radio wave beam.
So basically the EM waves are intertwined into a single beam, the the beams that absorb are in microscopic bundles, they could be sent even into the carbon cubed four inch block of matter in millisecond timed bursts.
The temperature of the block could be cooled, or even heated up to help with photons either not being absorbed, or help being absorbed.
So any invisible EM waves that do get absorbed by electrons, in ANY wavelength, or ANY frequency could the EM waves not get absorbed by the electrons, or would the electrons just it the surface of the carbon block, and always get absorbed, no matter what wavelength, or frequency, or the small amount of photons you sent to the block, mixed in with radio waves.
Question 2.
Also can the wavelength of any EM waves that DO get absorbed by electrons, can the wavelength be adjusted as the invisible EM waves are already inside the carbon block, if they do not get absorbed on the surface instantly.
Remember the temperature of the carbon block is a factor in absorption, whether the block is heated, up or cooled down.
Thank you for your help, anything helps even a few words.


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