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Old Jan 29th 2016, 08:07 PM   #1
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Smile Could combining light, and X-rays together, make opaque material with the least

How opaque a object is depends on energy of electrons, the BAND structure, not how amorphous it is, or how many electrons the element has.
All elements electrons differ in eV to move them from the ground state to shell 2.
So if light was combined with X-rays, and the light was either
1. slowed down, which can be done in a gas, I think, which probably would not effect absortion, and transmission at all.
2. Or if the light was filtered, to reduce the amount of photons, again would not effect absortion, transmission, or the energy of light was increased, which could ionize the electron so not to much power, just the right amount could it help get better diffraction depth.
3. Wavelength, and the frequency of light was reduced, or increased, as the light was combined with X-rays.
Could this cause a 4 inch cubed block of SOLID BLACK Carbon to have a few atoms in depth be more transparent, or even up to 20% or not at all.
As if eating away slowly at layers of the SOLID carbon gradually.
If electrons in any way can be effected to help stop absortion, and emission, please let me know.
Thank you for your help, anything helps even a few words.
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Old Jan 31st 2016, 01:20 PM   #2
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A little bit unsure what you are trying to ask,
Are you trying to suggest that the opacity of a material to one band of EM radiation (light) could be altered by irradiating the material with another band of EM radiation (X rays)?
I think you are suggesting that:
By raising the electrons in the atoms to higher energy bands (with the X rays), so that they will no longer be in energy bands amenable to absorption of light wavelengths, the opacity of the material to light waves might be altered.
Is this a reasonable paraphrasing of your post?
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Old Feb 1st 2016, 05:55 PM   #3
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Smile Dear MBW, thank you so much for your help, you answers help me learn more.

You said" By raising the electrons in the atoms to higher energy bands (with the X rays), so that they will no longer be in energy bands amenable to absorption of light wavelengths, the opacity of the material to light waves might be altered".
If what your saying can be done, and your just not asking whay I meant, then that means electrons can be affected by X-rays to make solid objects transparent.
Is this correct, can it be done.
Thank you for your help.
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Old Feb 3rd 2016, 02:12 PM   #4
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I have no idea if this process is feasible, or even sensible.
I was just trying to start a dialogue with you to try to understand your question.
I was intending that, once your question was clear, other members of the forum (who know more than me) would step in to tell you if the idea was worth pursuing further.

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Don't start new threads on the same topic.
If you don't get a response it is usually because we can't formulate a sensible answer,
this is generally because the question is confusing or unclear.
If you wish to refresh a dormant thread, you may add an extra post to it.
If you include additional clarification in the new post you are more likely to get a useful response.
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Last edited by MBW; Feb 3rd 2016 at 02:19 PM.
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Old Feb 3rd 2016, 02:59 PM   #5
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Smile Thank you for your answer...but

Your right, but maybe the only way to get the answer to this question is to do the experiment physically, and not ask about the outcome of the experiment in words.
This question has since been updated can you help.
exited in the electron. Can you tell me what would be the outcome of this light experiment. So you mix X-rays with red light, the X-rays excite the electron to a higher shell level 2, or 3. Then the red light with the shortest wavelength, when it hits the electron as the electron is in shell 2, or 3 would the electron get excited, or not by the red light. The electron is only going to be in shell 2, and 3 for a for a very short time, but maybe the red light does not have the energy to excite the electron while it is in shell 2, and 3. Remember the red light, and X-rays are mixed together as a single wave, or more X-rays hit electrons first, then milliseconds later the red light hits the electron, whatever works best for the light to travel through a opaque SOLID material, kind of like glass. The effect I want to get is to make the electron not absorb light, for light to pass through, and make a object a little bit translucent, by 20%. Similar to glass, how electrons do not get excited by light. Thank you for your help, anything helps even a few words.

Originally Posted by MBW View Post
I have no idea if this process is feasible, or even sensible.
I was just trying to start a dialogue with you to try to understand your question.
I was intending that, once your question was clear, other members of the forum (who know more than me) would step in to tell you if the idea was worth pursuing further.

P.S.
Don't start new threads on the same topic.
If you don't get a response it is usually because we can't formulate a sensible answer,
this is generally because the question is confusing or unclear.
If you wish to refresh a dormant thread, you may add an extra post to it.
If you include additional clarification in the new post you are more likely to get a useful response.
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Old Feb 3rd 2016, 03:01 PM   #6
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Smile Wait YOU SAID THE IDEA WAS WORTH PURSUING, AS IN YOU THOUGH IT COULD WORK

Could the idea work then with X rays, and RED light.
Originally Posted by timemachine2 View Post
Your right, but maybe the only way to get the answer to this question is to do the experiment physically, and not ask about the outcome of the experiment in words.
This question has since been updated can you help.
exited in the electron. Can you tell me what would be the outcome of this light experiment. So you mix X-rays with red light, the X-rays excite the electron to a higher shell level 2, or 3. Then the red light with the shortest wavelength, when it hits the electron as the electron is in shell 2, or 3 would the electron get excited, or not by the red light. The electron is only going to be in shell 2, and 3 for a for a very short time, but maybe the red light does not have the energy to excite the electron while it is in shell 2, and 3. Remember the red light, and X-rays are mixed together as a single wave, or more X-rays hit electrons first, then milliseconds later the red light hits the electron, whatever works best for the light to travel through a opaque SOLID material, kind of like glass. The effect I want to get is to make the electron not absorb light, for light to pass through, and make a object a little bit translucent, by 20%. Similar to glass, how electrons do not get excited by light. Thank you for your help, anything helps even a few words.
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Old Feb 5th 2016, 07:54 PM   #7
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Smile If you mix red light with X-rays, can transmission of the red light occur through a S

-Olid object while electrons are in shells 2, and 3.
If you mixed X-rays, with red light, red light has the lowest wavelength of all light.
When the electron moves from the ground state to the next shell level 2, or 3 after being excited by the X-rays.
For that brief period of time that the electrons are in the higher shells, is it possible for red light that was mixed with the X rays, to hit the electron while it is in shell 2, and 3 and not get excited, and let the red light pass through a SOLID opaque material, like SOLID black carbon.
So the electrons would not get excited by the red light because the light does not have enough energy to exite the electron while in shell, 2, 3, or a higher shell.
Kind of like how glass works, light does not have enough energy to excite electrons in glass, so glass is transparent to light.
I want to know if a solid opaque objects can be made translucent, by 20% by using this technique. If you do not know the answer to this question, and you think it needs to be tested in a science experiment, to get the answer, please say so.
Thank you for your help, anything helps even a few words.
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