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Old Mar 21st 2014, 03:40 PM   #1
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Lightbulb Is it true that space sucks the air out of things?

I have the conception that space sucks the air out of things. Is this true? Why does it do it, and where does the airmolecules go? Do they just spread around random out into space? What would happen to a man in space? Thanks
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Old Mar 21st 2014, 07:45 PM   #2
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Space Doesn't Suck

Remember, Heat is the motion of atoms, so all the atoms in the air are moving,
normally they can only go so far before they hit another atom, or a wall, or are pulled down by gravity.
In space there is nothing to stop them, so they just keep going.

I have read that a person can survive for a surprising amount of time in a vacuum
perhaps even as much as a minute,
but it would be a very uncomfortable minute.
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Old Mar 22nd 2014, 06:48 AM   #3
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Wouldn't the vacuume try to equal the pressure between the to spaces? Isn't that what happens if there is a leak in an airplane that flies high? The air gets sucked out of the airplane? Wouldn't the same thing happen to a human in a vacuum? Thanks
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Old Mar 22nd 2014, 12:13 PM   #4
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Gas-less Spaces (even deep space) do not "Suck."

Were an aircraft structure at altitude is pierced, air would exit the
frame because of the "push" of the air inside. Outside there is much less
air. This "outside air" has no means whereby to effect any action upon the inside air (upon puncture).

Actual, physical space, is not empty. In the vicinity of the moon, the mass in space is classed as "free-molecular." The same case is at say 500 miles above earth. Pressure is defined for continuum conditions. You are onto an interesting topic.

http://www.thermospokenhere.com/wp/0...rminology.html
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Old Mar 22nd 2014, 02:01 PM   #5
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Ok. So the air doesn't get sucked out by the lower pressure. Thanks
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Old Mar 24th 2014, 06:40 AM   #6
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Humans in a Vacuum

In everyday life the pressure of the air pushing on your body equivalent to about 15 pounds (force) on every square inch.
Our bodies are balanced at that pressure, so we barely notice it.
In other words everything inside our bodies is pushing back at 15 pounds per square inch.
Take away the air and the only thing holding our insides in, is our skin.
All your insides would be pressing to get out, at 15 PSI.
Apparently our skin is strong enough to hold this, but I imagine it would be very painful.
Faeces and urine would be pushed out at this pressure (you would mess your pants).

Another effect is that water starts to boil at lower temperatures when the pressure is lower.
Thus tears, saliva, etc. would all turn, quite rapidly, from liquid to gas.

I should add that I am just putting together bits and pieces I have read here and there.
Is there anyone out there with better knowledge of the (preferably gruesome) effects of a vacuum on an unprotected human?
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Old Mar 24th 2014, 06:42 AM   #7
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Are you saying that water will turn to gass in a vacuume? Thanks
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Old Mar 24th 2014, 06:55 AM   #8
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Yes,
Part of what keeps water a liquid (rather than a gas) is the pressure of the air above it.
Reduce the pressure and it boils at a lower temperature,
Lower the pressure enough and water will boil at room temperature.
Conversely if you raise the pressure, water will boil at a higher temperature than normal.
A pressure cooker takes advantage of this, to boil food at temperatures higher than the normal boiling point of water, by raising the pressure.
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Old Mar 24th 2014, 07:31 AM   #9
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What happens when water is boiling? Thanks
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