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Old Oct 7th 2018, 06:34 AM   #1
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Fundamental Laws

What determines the fundamental laws of physics?

The correlation of...events...when expressed simplified are the laws stated.

What are the causations behind the fundamental laws of physics?
Sub-fundamental laws?* Of physics?

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Old Oct 7th 2018, 06:59 AM   #2
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The nearest thing we have to an answer to this is called Noether's theorem.

In terms of Physical laws it requires every symmetry in Physics gives rise to a conservation law.

Other than that you could look a mathamtical group theory, which establishes order in the zoo (table) of particles in the area of fundamental particle physics.
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Old Oct 7th 2018, 04:51 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by zz31 View Post
What determines the fundamental laws of physics?

The correlation of...events...when expressed simplified are the laws stated.

What are the causations behind the fundamental laws of physics?
Sub-fundamental laws?* Of physics?

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Well... the point of the word "fundamental" is that those laws aren't derivative from others. If such a derivative is available, those laws are not fundamental.

As for whether there are more fundamental laws than the ones we know about? Well, who knows... let's find out
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Old Oct 8th 2018, 06:43 AM   #4
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There is a lot of concern in physics over the "magic" numbers that litter the "fundamental" features of physics.
There seems to be no particular reason for the perfect balancing of these numbers.
It is quite possible that there is an inescapable reason in the structure of the "stuff" that makes the universe that mandates the values of these constants.

However, we have very little idea what the fundamental "stuff" of the universe actually is.
We can say, with quite exquisite detail, what it does, but know very little about what it is.
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Old Oct 12th 2018, 03:46 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by zz31 View Post
What determines the fundamental laws of physics?

The correlation of...events...when expressed simplified are the laws stated.

What are the causations behind the fundamental laws of physics?
Sub-fundamental laws?* Of physics?

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Nobody knows. The laws are descriptions of nature with no known cause as to why they are the way they are.
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Old Oct 12th 2018, 03:52 PM   #6
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You think someone would of the asked the question before. Let alone make a suggestion. Or idk a branch of science. Couldn't find any knowledge or info in history about it. So if I make a suggestion than I'll be the first one?

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Old Oct 13th 2018, 06:45 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by zz31 View Post
You think someone would of the asked the question before. Let alone make a suggestion. Or idk a branch of science. Couldn't find any knowledge or info in history about it. So if I make a suggestion than I'll be the first one?

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Fundamental laws in Physics come from experiments getting results that are unexpected or by ideas spawned by experiments. Remember all of Physics (and any other branch of Physics, Chemistry, etc.) are empirical. How to search for them? Pick up any High School or Freshman Physics class. There is no branch of science (that I know of) that makes of list of these, as opposed to Mathematics, which is not an empirical field of study. Those you can list.

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Old Oct 13th 2018, 07:03 AM   #8
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I'm not sure what you're saying.* Your point of science is an empirical field of study is valid.* Thank you for that.* I only am saying that knowing why physics uses math seems useful to know.* More useful than knowing the math.* It may take longer to find out than all the centries it took to learn the math...* So that's why we use the math we know works.

Why isn't there any attempt for empirical study to find out in history or even the question posed.

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Old Oct 13th 2018, 10:46 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by zz31 View Post
You think someone would of the asked the question before. Let alone make a suggestion. Or idk a branch of science. Couldn't find any knowledge or info in history about it. So if I make a suggestion than I'll be the first one?
Not really. Most good physics students will ask this question or come to learn it while studying physics. Especially if they take a philosophy of science class. This subject is in a text called Classical Charged Particles by Fritz Rohrlich. I thought it was so important that I scanned it and placed it on my website.

See: http://www.newenglandphysics.org/oth...of_physics.pdf
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Old Oct 17th 2018, 07:00 PM   #10
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What do you think the probability that there is a relationship between motion (a value) of matter (mass) depending on energy (mass and momentum) that can be constantly predicted using the exact same distance between numbers (math, etc) and have it be predicted throughout time over again? I mean by chance. What developes the distances between the numbers on the number-line, I mean holdes them ridgedly apart and together? The same in different locations, in time? Geomertry, basically; but geomerty w/ operations?

Are there any exceptions to the fundamental laws of physics? I mean what's the cause making them consistent? Or occurring more than once at all?

What do you think the probability to the fundamental laws, and have it be predicted throughout time over again, I mean by chance.



wrote this fast, hope you see what im getting at.

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