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Old Oct 17th 2018, 07:09 PM   #11
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Where does the green arrow in the picture come from? For real?

If you push on the wall...Force...and remove the wall...you go into motion.
If you remove yourself, the wall dosent go into motion. Either way while pushing on the wall where does the opposite force "from the wall", come from?

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Old Oct 18th 2018, 02:08 AM   #12
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Actually the wall does move!
Just a tiny fraction because bricks are so stiff and inflexible,
but this tiny fraction is enough to create tension between the molecules of the brick
which generates the force pushing back.
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Old Oct 18th 2018, 02:15 AM   #13
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Really? I believe you. Makes sense. How does a force always result in an opposite force? I suppose it would start back as equal, but loose some at a point...

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Old Oct 18th 2018, 02:26 AM   #14
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The phrase is "every action gets an equal and opposite reaction"

If the force is not balanced by an equal and opposite force, the reaction is movement (acceleration).

So the wall moves until the tension in the wall produces a force equal to the force pushing against it, then the movement stops.

If the force pushing against the wall gets so large that the tension in the wall exceeds the strength of the cement, then the wall falls down.
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