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Old Oct 3rd 2018, 02:58 PM   #1
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Waves

Home work question

If you wave a rope hanging from a long vertical distance with a constant frequency, what will happen to the frequency and wave length farter up the rope.

I think the velocity of the wave will decrease due to gravity so the frequency and wavelength would also decrease.

Is my answer correct or am I missing something?
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Old Oct 4th 2018, 03:24 AM   #2
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There are relationships between variables relevant for the oscillation of a rope (such as frequency) and the properties of the object that is oscillating (such as length and tension). If you look up the formulae online and write them down, you can use them to indicate how the other variables change if the length changes.
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Old Oct 5th 2018, 01:55 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by beastbaws View Post
Home work question

If you wave a rope hanging from a long vertical distance with a constant frequency, what will happen to the frequency and wave length farter up the rope.

I think the velocity of the wave will decrease due to gravity so the frequency and wavelength would also decrease.

Is my answer correct or am I missing something?
"frequency" and "wave length" are reciprocal- if one decreases the other increases. They cannot both decrease.
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Old Oct 5th 2018, 05:29 AM   #4
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Hi Halls,
You are of course correct the wavelength and frequency are inversely related,
however the constant of proportionality is the speed of propagation of the wave.
So by changing the speed of propagation it is possible to reduce both the frequency and the wavelength

However, I don't think this will be of any significance to the original problem.
I would guess that the key issue would probably be the tension.
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