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Old Feb 27th 2018, 06:35 AM   #1
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I'm a person with ideas! :D

I've been interested in physics for a long while now, and I thought I would present a few questions/ideas

Q#1: What would happen if a particle quantum entangled with itself?
I#1: Black holes puncture an infinite hole in spacetime, so wouldn't that mean that there is no singularity, as nothing would ever reach the center with an infinite hole in spacetime?
I#2: Let us assume we had a spaceship capable of bending spacetime indefinitely, and you use it to dive into a black hole, would you be able to see the processes going on inside the black hole and still be able to live to tell the tale?
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Old Mar 13th 2018, 03:59 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by APersonWithIdeas View Post
I've been interested in physics for a long while now, and I thought I would present a few questions/ideas

Q#1: What would happen if a particle quantum entangled with itself?
In entanglement, the state of two particles, e.g. their choice of spin quantum number (e.g. s=+1/2 for particle 1 and s=-1/2 for particle 2) are intertwined such that a change to one particle (e.g. particle 1 changes its spin from +1/2 to -1/2) causes a change in the other (particle 2's spin changes from -1/2 to +1/2).

If a particle were able to entangle with itself... what does this mean? I guess it means, perhaps, that a single particle has two states at the same time and those two states are entangled, but a particle having two states at the same time doesn't really make sense since it is a single object. Maybe if you considered a molecule, but then that's not really entanglement since there's definite physics going on with the bonding that differs from entanglement.

I#1: Black holes puncture an infinite hole in spacetime, so wouldn't that mean that there is no singularity, as nothing would ever reach the center with an infinite hole in spacetime?
The 'singularity' is the name for something in mathematics where the parameter of interested, such as mass, tends towards an infinite value at a point. In the case of black holes, the density tends towards infinity at the centre of the object, so it is often referred to as a singularity. Singularities are a problem in physics because they often yield weird effects that don't make sense and, for the case of black holes, the interior structure remains an open problem.

As for "puncturing and infinite hole in space-time"? That's a fancy description for accepting that the singularity is actually the real behaviour, but I don't think anyone really knows what black hole interiors are like; we just have to speculate with clever mathematics until we do know.

I#2: Let us assume we had a spaceship capable of bending spacetime indefinitely, and you use it to dive into a black hole, would you be able to see the processes going on inside the black hole and still be able to live to tell the tale?
If you're referring to "bending space-time" as an ability to "mimic the behaviour of the environment around massive gravitational bodies" then you'll experience time dilation and all the other weird and wonderful effects of relativity. However, if you mean "create a black hole and then travel towards it" then, apart from being totally crushed by the gravitational forces, you would see a lot of strange relativistic effects. I'm not exactly sure would you would see, but there's physicists who have studied black holes and could probably predict the kind of thing that would be seen (and also what people would observe you doing).

Last edited by benit13; Mar 13th 2018 at 04:03 AM.
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Old Mar 13th 2018, 06:31 AM   #3
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What is a quantum particle?

Note that this is MY idea, I'm not sure if others will agree with this, but here goes anyway...

A quantum particle is a region of space-time that has particular properties, that distinguish it from other regions of space-time.

We recognise this region of space-time as a particle via it's interactions with other regions of space-time, particularly with regions of space-time that can also be identified as having particle status.

One of the possible interactions between two such regions is entanglement.

Note that this definition precludes entanglement of a particle with itself.
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Old Mar 13th 2018, 09:50 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Woody View Post
Note that this is MY idea, I'm not sure if others will agree with this, but here goes anyway...

A quantum particle is a region of space-time that has particular properties, that distinguish it from other regions of space-time.

We recognise this region of space-time as a particle via it's interactions with other regions of space-time, particularly with regions of space-time that can also be identified as having particle status.

One of the possible interactions between two such regions is entanglement.

Note that this definition precludes entanglement of a particle with itself.
Ideas like this are not uncommon but you have to ask yourself how it can be verified experimentally. One problem I see here is that you may be confusing regions of space with regions of spacetime. After all, two particles can move relative to each other. That notion is meaningless when it comes to spacetime. And, to my knowledge, speaking of space moving is not something that can be verified by experiment. Also particles are point-like with no extension in space.
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Last edited by Pmb; Mar 13th 2018 at 09:54 AM.
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Old Mar 13th 2018, 12:19 PM   #5
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I agree, it must be space not spacetime.

I think though that "point like" brings us to problems with singularities,
and I always feel that the appearance of singularities in a theory indicates that something is missing in the theory.

I came across an article (I can't remember where now) which suggested that some of the re-normalization difficulties might be mitigated by allowing particles to have some size.

I would argue that particles do have some extent (just very very small).
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