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Old May 13th 2017, 02:56 AM   #1
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Does more heat imply more energy?

We know that ultraviolet light has more energy. So can we say that ultraviolet light is hotter than violet spectrum of a hot object?
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Old May 13th 2017, 03:44 AM   #2
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No it's not like that.

Temperature is a measure of 'hotter' or 'colder', not energy.

But temperature is a property that only applies to matter of atomic or molecular size and above.

It has no meaning for massless and sub atomic particles.

Temperature is quite independent of the quantity of energy concerned.

For example you are hotter than the ocean but the ocean has vastly more energy than you do.

As a matter of interest the energy of electromagnetic radiation, including ordinary and ultraviolet light increases with frequency.
This is why UV has a higher energy than ordinary light - it has a higher frequency.

A higher frequency is also associated with a shorter wavelength.
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Old May 14th 2017, 03:09 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by studiot View Post

Temperature is a measure of 'hotter' or 'colder', not energy.

.
I'm not sure that's right ...thousands of Km above the earth , almost vacuum conditions , the temperature is 2000*C ... but it would 'feel' very cold (unless the sun was shining)...

Temperature is a measure of the speed of atoms/molecules....

... and perhaps (with a stretch of imagination) solid bodies like asteroids .... a fast moving asteroid could be viewed as 'hot' , how hot depends on it's speed , a thermometer in the asteroid would say it's cold ... the heat is only apparent when it impacts a surface.

Last edited by oz93666; May 14th 2017 at 03:21 AM.
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Old May 14th 2017, 10:44 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by oz93666 View Post
I'm not sure that's right ...thousands of Km above the earth , almost vacuum conditions , the temperature is 2000*C ... but it would 'feel' very cold (unless the sun was shining)...

Temperature is a measure of the speed of atoms/molecules....

... and perhaps (with a stretch of imagination) solid bodies like asteroids .... a fast moving asteroid could be viewed as 'hot' , how hot depends on it's speed , a thermometer in the asteroid would say it's cold ... the heat is only apparent when it impacts a surface.
Please check your facts.
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Old May 15th 2017, 09:17 AM   #5
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Temperature is (essentially) a measure of the kinetic energy of atoms/ions/molecules etc.
Note that this does not necessarily allow the direct relationship between temperature and the speed of these items that you suggest.
In particular (as Studiot indicates) temperature cannot be applied to massless items.

Having said that, the wavelength of EM radiation emitted by an object will (often) depend on its temperature (as in red hot, white hot, etc.).
Thus an ultra-violet photon will have (likely) been emitted by a hotter object than a violet photon.

But it is not correct to say that an ultra-violet photon is hotter than a violet one.

Last edited by Woody; May 15th 2017 at 09:19 AM.
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