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Old Apr 5th 2017, 06:53 AM   #1
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Need guidance from some one who has knowledge about spectroscopy

hi friends,
I am new to this forum and to this domain as well,i am basically a networking/IT guy, i am looking to do some
project which is involving spectroscopy to find chemical composition in different elements.

As i am new to this domain,i dont know how i can find a friend/guide probably some one with good knowledge in physics to guide me or just to get a few words of positive advice from him.

if any one is interested to help me kindly let me know here,all i want is talk to someone and want to be inspired.
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Old Apr 5th 2017, 09:31 AM   #2
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Just to be clear, do you mean chemical elements, or chemical compounds?
Chemical compounds (generally) interact with longer wavelength EM radiation than Chemical elements.

The (main) interaction with chemical elements tends to be due to the electrons absorbing (or emitting) highly specific wavelengths where the photon energy quite precisely matches the difference in energy between different stable arrangements of the electrons within the atoms.

The (main) interaction with chemical compounds is due to the energy of the photons causing various bits of the compound (atoms or groups of atoms) to move with respect to each other.

The wavelength required depends on the strength of the chemical bond, and the mass of the chemical groups on either end of the chemical bond.

At the simplest level you can just look up the wavelength of maximum interaction of various common chemical bonds in a table.
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Old Apr 5th 2017, 10:25 AM   #3
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Thanks a lot for the explanation .I am looking to analyse
The chemical composition of various food items to be precise.any more useful tips about how I can start or how I can find anyone who can help ?
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Old Apr 7th 2017, 01:57 AM   #4
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The spectrum becomes more complex as the number of different chemical bonds, in the sample being tested, become higher.
(Note that different relates to the different chemical structures on either end of the bond as much as any difference in the bond itself).
For even simple flavour or scent molecules there may be tens of different types of bonds in the molecule, for complex proteins there may be hundreds.
Interpreting the spectrum is obviously easier if the number of different responding bonds is smaller.
If you have lots of very similar bonds (as you probably will have in the long carbon chain molecules typically found in food) then you will not get nice discrete peaks in the spectrum, but rather a broad hump.
If you have more than one species of molecule in the sample, then separating the responses of the different molecules becomes difficult, becoming exponentially more difficult as the number of different molecules in the sample increases.
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