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Old Jun 23rd 2014, 01:58 AM   #1
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Heat transfer mechanism in a stove.

Hi:

In the case of a home stove (heater), fed by natural gas, which is the main mechanism of heat transfer? Radiation, conduction or convection? The stove belongs the a class know in my country as "infrared stove", supposed to emit in the infrared. Lets assume I am a long distance from the stove, as compared to the stove size.
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Old Jun 23rd 2014, 07:52 AM   #2
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The term "infrared" means that the stove heats objects in the room through infrared radiation that it emits and that is absorbed by objects that are in "line of sight" of the stove. For example if you can see the stove you can sense heat from it against your face, but if you hold up a piece of paper in front of your face to block the line of sight that sensation of heat goes away. It would be different if the heat was transferred by convection - in that case the air itself is heated and it doesn't matter whether you are in line of sight of the stove or not.
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Old Jun 23rd 2014, 11:31 AM   #3
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Thank you. OK. Now consider two identical adjacent square rooms connected by a door. as you can find in most houses. Our stove is in one of them and can be rotated about its central axis. In one position, position A, the stove faces the door. Position B is obtained by rotating 90 degrees from position A.

Oh yes, built in the stove there is a reflective surface which directs heat ahead of it. Then according to what you said, the temperature in the room without the stove will be higher when the stove is in position A. Am I right?

EDIT: I now see the answer is obvious. We can replace the stove by a flashlight. So let's make the stove a regular one, so convection, as you pointed out, will be here, the main heat transfer mechanism by far. It still has a plane reflective surface.

Last edited by ENRIQUESTEFANINI; Jun 23rd 2014 at 11:48 AM.
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Old Jun 23rd 2014, 12:11 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by ENRIQUESTEFANINI View Post
EDIT: I now see the answer is obvious. We can replace the stove by a flashlight.
Good analogy

Originally Posted by ENRIQUESTEFANINI View Post
So let's make the stove a regular one, so convection, as you pointed out, will be here, the main heat transfer mechanism by far. It still has a plane reflective surface.
What's your question? Do you want to know which room gets warmer? That too should be obvious - convective heating works through air circulation from the warm body of the stove to the colder areas of the room, or rooms. So which room do you think is going to have more air circulating from the stove?
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Old Jun 23rd 2014, 03:16 PM   #5
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Well, the one where the stove is. This, sources and sinks all of the flux lines, so to speak. From this, it is one step only to show it. No. The question consists of (sorry for that) the phrase "Am I right" in the post, just before the word EDIT, with the provision the stove is now a "convection one":
Originally Posted by ENRIQUESTEFANINI View Post
Thank you. OK. Now consider two identical adjacent square rooms connected by a door. as you can find in most houses. Our stove is in one of them and can be rotated about its central axis. In one position, position A, the stove faces the door. Position B is obtained by rotating 90 degrees from position A.

Oh yes, built in the stove there is a reflective surface which directs heat ahead of it. Then according to what you said, the temperature in the room without the stove will be higher when the stove is in position A. Am I right?
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