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Old Jun 25th 2010, 09:51 AM   #11
Pmb
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Originally Posted by clombard1973 View Post
This problem by no means required knowing any quantum mechanics to solve for the solution.
I didn't suggest otherwise. I merely noted that, in the future, if a poster wanted to ask questions about semiconductors might best go to the QM section. Sorry if I was unclear about that.
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Old Jun 25th 2010, 10:41 AM   #12
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Smile You weren't unclear

Originally Posted by Pmb View Post
I didn't suggest otherwise. I merely noted that, in the future, if a poster wanted to ask questions about semiconductors might best go to the QM section. Sorry if I was unclear about that.
Hi there,
No you were not unclear. I did agree with you completely in that I had said,
I know diodes and other semiconducting elements are better understood using a QM analysis.
and
If the OP had asked about the internal operation of charge transport through a diode I would have referred him to the QM forum.
I think the physics of semiconductors is very interesting and I also think the QM forum is a better place to speak about why silicon itself is a poor conductor but if it is doped with say Phosphorus, an electron donor, it becomes an n-type semiconductor, and doping another piece of silicon with impurity atoms of Boron, an electron acceptor, can make a p-type semiconductor. Combining the two forms a junction where charge is exchanged and an E field exists at that junction. The exact nature of how well conduction occurs relating to the work function needed to be overcome. All the "nitty gritty" of semiconductors is probably best taken into the QM forum.

So no disagreements from me about your suggestion.
Many Thanks,
Craig
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Old Jun 26th 2010, 12:02 AM   #13
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Howdy!!
Originally Posted by clombard1973 View Post
Hi there,
No you were not unclear. I did agree with you completely in that I had said, and ..
That's not what I meant. I meant that I may have been unclear in that I was not suggesting that the response to the OP was incorrect in any way, shape or form.
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Old Jun 26th 2010, 01:25 AM   #14
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Smile Oh

Originally Posted by Pmb View Post
Howdy!!

That's not what I meant. I meant that I may have been unclear in that I was not suggesting that the response to the OP was incorrect in any way, shape or form.
OK,
Howdy to you my friend,
I'm glad you found nothing incorrect with my response to the OP, but your unnecessary apology about being unclear was a little unclear.
Take care,
Craig
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Old Jun 26th 2010, 01:42 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by clombard1973 View Post
OK,
Howdy to you my friend,
I'm glad you found nothing incorrect with my response to the OP, but your unnecessary apology about being unclear was a little unclear.
That's probably because it was a double negative.
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Old Jul 24th 2010, 03:02 AM   #16
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Smile Look at post #8

Originally Posted by resumedocket View Post
Would you mind showing a figure of the circuit? i can't quite visualize it.
Thanks!


Resume Writing Services
Hi there,
In post number 8 I attached a pdf file with the circuit and solution within it.
Craig
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Old Sep 6th 2010, 07:12 AM   #17
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Go Away!

Originally Posted by David Warner View Post
As you recall from previous studies in this series, semiconductors have electrical properties somewhere between those of insulators and conductors. The use of semiconductor materials in electronic components is not new; some devices are as old as the electron tube. Two of the most widely known semiconductors in use today are the JUNCTION DIODE and TRANSISTOR. These semiconductors fall under a more general heading called solid-state devices. A SOLID-STATE DEVICE is nothing more than an electronic device, which operates by virtue of the movement of electrons within a solid piece of semiconductor material.
Clearly you are just copying and pasting your information at these posts as it begins with, "As you recall from the previous studies in this series," What previous studies. Have you been teaching semiconductor physics somewhere that none of knows about. I know what a semiconductor is and how all semiconductor devices operate, do you? The original question had nothing to do with a transistor (something you probably do not even know how it works), try helping the OP instead of posting crap for others to see.
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