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Old Apr 13th 2018, 01:08 AM   #1
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new Plasma Globe Question

the plasma globe has a random pattern of energy emitted but when a fluorescent bulb or even a figure comes into contact proximity of the globe a easier path of conductivity is formed and the path becomes non-random.

My question is since the path is non-random is there some type of sensor which can correspond with the path direction?

I mean, what method would be needed to identify where the globes energy is being pulled towards?

Sincerely,
QP
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Old Apr 13th 2018, 08:00 PM   #2
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This is an electrical discharge , so the plasma will be drawn to the point on the globe where it can easily get to Earth. Your finger or a fluorescent tube on the outside will give the plasma a short path to earth....

Without a clear path , the plasma is not sure/doesn't care where it should go and will jump around .
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Old Apr 14th 2018, 05:24 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by oz93666 View Post
This is an electrical discharge , so the plasma will be drawn to the point on the globe where it can easily get to Earth. Your finger or a fluorescent tube on the outside will give the plasma a short path to earth....

Without a clear path , the plasma is not sure/doesn't care where it should go and will jump around .
Yes the device outside the globe (finger, flourescent tube, probe tip connected to earth gorund etc) attracts the plasma which as you say is seeking a path to ground.

However it does 'know where to go' in that the individual discahrges that are observed within the globe are trying to spread out to get as far away from each other as possible.
They do this because they are like charges which repel.
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Old Apr 14th 2018, 03:13 PM   #4
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guys,
thank you for your response, though the question remains.

what method would be needed to identify where the globes energy is being pulled towards?

a visual path can be seen of the load, so in what ways can this be measured?
the load being the fluorescent bulb pulling as its brought into contact proximity.

Sincerely,
QP
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Old Apr 14th 2018, 03:20 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by QuestionablePhysics View Post
guys,
thank you for your response, though the question remains.

what method would be needed to identify where the globes energy is being pulled towards?

a visual path can be seen of the load, so in what ways can this be measured?
the load being the fluorescent bulb pulling as its brought into contact proximity.

Sincerely,
QP
The question was indeed answered.

It is specifically why I introduced the grounded probe, since you asked about an instrument.


What did you not understand about that?
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Old Apr 14th 2018, 05:00 PM   #6
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well I was expecting something more scientific
such as using an oscilloscope to measure the impedance etc.
and of course detailed steps to get an accurate reading.
and of course anything case specific to the exact question.

duh
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Old Apr 14th 2018, 07:39 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by QuestionablePhysics View Post
well I was expecting something more scientific
such as using an oscilloscope to measure the impedance etc.
and of course detailed steps to get an accurate reading.
and of course anything case specific to the exact question.

duh
I'm still unclear of your question .... just by bringing a probe or anything else near the globe will change the behaviour of the plasma and effect the experiment ..

It's a very complex and difficult to predict system .... Perhaps similar to lightning strikes on Earth... you would expect them to be at the highest and most well grounded points on the planet, but that's rarely the case.
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Old Apr 14th 2018, 07:53 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by oz93666 View Post
I'm still unclear of your question .... just by bringing a probe or anything else near the globe will change the behaviour of the plasma and effect the experiment ..

It's a very complex and difficult to predict system .... Perhaps similar to lightning strikes on Earth... you would expect them to be at the highest and most well grounded points on the planet, but that's rarely the case.
yes in the unloaded plasma globe its random and like lightning strikes as I stated in my first post!

but once you bring an object in proximity you load the EM field and as we are taught in electronics school loads can be measured.

so the question to become very clear: what steps are necessary to measure and identify the load?
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Old Apr 14th 2018, 11:12 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by QuestionablePhysics View Post
what steps are necessary to measure and identify the load?
load is not the right word ....

You want to measure the voltage , current , and frequency of the electricity which travels when a probe is brought near the globe ???...

Yes an oscilloscope is the thing you need , one probe grounded (you can hold it), the other probe bring slowly towards the globe as you can damage the globe electronics (see Wikipedia page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasma_globe) ... the frequency is around 35KHz ... set the scope to high voltage setting.
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Old Apr 14th 2018, 11:42 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by oz93666 View Post
load is not the right word ....

You want to measure the voltage , current , and frequency of the electricity which travels when a probe is brought near the globe ???... {NO}

Yes an oscilloscope is the thing you need , one probe grounded (you can hold it), the other probe bring slowly towards the globe as you can damage the globe electronics (see Wikipedia page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasma_globe) ... the frequency is around 35KHz ... set the scope to high voltage setting.
yes I believe load is the correct word and your misinterpreting what the goal is. when you bring a fluorescent bulb near the globe it puts a load upon the circuit. you can see this load visually with the EM being pulled towards the bulb and increase in intensity towards the bulb as contact increases. I believe the contact resulting in induced current in the bulb is the result of closing a RLC circuit thru induction, in which case there would be an impedance LOAD which is measurable. I also believe there are other attributes of the load which are measurable. I've been very clear in my detail to explain this and I never said I wish to measure frequency of the globe as you've simply put. but apparently you are either holding out, don't know the answer, or just getting kicks messing with people.
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