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Old Apr 16th 2018, 12:37 PM   #31
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You are asking for a sensor that detects the electric field around the plasma globe
It strikes me that the plasma globe itself is such a sensor.
When the field around the globe is essentially uniform,
the plasma discharges seemingly at random around the globe in response to tiny natural variations due to air currents, dust particles, etc...
When there is a definite non-uniform field near the globe, the discharge direction will indicate the direction of non-uniformity.
The intensity and compactness of the discharge will indicate the degree of the fields non-uniformity.
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Old Apr 16th 2018, 07:44 PM   #32
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Another and easier approach is to measure the input to the globe itself ...

I believe most globes run on an input supply of 12V DC , you can measure current under different conditions , and see the change in power when a load is applied ....

you could also tap into the electronics inside measure the output voltage and frequency and current
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Old Apr 16th 2018, 08:29 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Woody View Post
You are asking for a sensor that detects the electric field around the plasma globe
It strikes me that the plasma globe itself is such a sensor.
When the field around the globe is essentially uniform,
the plasma discharges seemingly at random around the globe in response to tiny natural variations due to air currents, dust particles, etc...
When there is a definite non-uniform field near the globe, the discharge direction will indicate the direction of non-uniformity.
The intensity and compactness of the discharge will indicate the degree of the fields non-uniformity.
yes woody thanks for the input, I do agree that the globe appears to react to stimulus, unfortunately I do not know how to electronically monitor the uniformity of the field around the globe. would you have any suggestions upon how to do that? what type of circuit would I need?

thanks,
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Old Apr 17th 2018, 12:52 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by oz93666 View Post
Another and easier approach is to measure the input to the globe itself ...

I believe most globes run on an input supply of 12V DC , you can measure current under different conditions , and see the change in power when a load is applied ....

you could also tap into the electronics inside measure the output voltage and frequency and current
Exactly. That's what the sensitive wattmeter I proposed was for.

All that is then needed is to correctly set up the rest of the experiment.

Last edited by studiot; Apr 17th 2018 at 01:12 AM.
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Old Apr 17th 2018, 02:04 AM   #35
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So you are looking for equipment with which you can calibrate the response of the plasma globe.
I guess such equipment must exist, but I don't know about it...

Another approach might be to construct a structure for which the resultant electrical field can be calculated.
(is that even possible?)

Measuring the current demand of the globe itself (as suggested by OZ) might give useful information.
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Old Apr 17th 2018, 02:20 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by Woody View Post
So you are looking for equipment with which you can calibrate the response of the plasma globe.
I guess such equipment must exist, but I don't know about it...

Another approach might be to construct a structure for which the resultant electrical field can be calculated.
(is that even possible?)

Measuring the current demand of the globe itself (as suggested by OZ) might give useful information.
Yes, Woody, that is the second part of my proposal. +1
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