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Old Nov 12th 2018, 01:58 PM   #1
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Lightbulb problem 11.1 from Ashcroft and Mermin.

I asked my question in physicsforums, perhaps someone here knows how to solve it or can provide guidance.

https://www.physicsforums.com/thread...xtbook.958929/

Thanks!
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Old Nov 12th 2018, 03:16 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Alan View Post
I asked my question in physicsforums, perhaps someone here knows how to solve it or can provide guidance.

https://www.physicsforums.com/thread...xtbook.958929/

Thanks!
Please post the original problem when posting between fora.

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Old Nov 12th 2018, 05:57 PM   #3
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I never knew that the plural form of "forum" is "fora" instead of "forums"...
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Old Nov 13th 2018, 12:01 AM   #4
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1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
Let ##\vec{r}## locate a point just within the boundary of a primitive cell ##C_0## and ##\vec{r}'## another point infinitesimally displaced from ##\vec{r}## just outside the same boundary. The continuity equations for ##\psi(\vec{r})## are:
$$ (11.37) \lim_{r\to r'} [\psi(\vec{r})-\psi(\vec{r}')]=0$$
$$\lim_{r\to r'} [\nabla \psi(\vec{r})-\nabla \psi(\vec{r}')]=0$$

(a) Verify that any point ##\vec{r}## on the surface of a primitive cell is separated by some Bravais lattice vector ##\vec{R}## from another surface point and that the normals to the cell at ##\vec{r}## and ##\vec{r}+\vec{R}## are oppositely directed.
(b) Using the fact that ##\psi## can be chosen to have the Bloch form, show that the continuity conditions can equally well be written in terms of the values of ##\psi## entirely withing a primitive cell:
$$(11.38) \psi(\vec{r}) = e^{-i\vec{k}\cdot\vec{r}}\psi(\vec{r}+\vec{R})$$
$$\nabla \psi(\vec{r})= e^{-i\vec{k}\cdot \vec{R}}\nabla \psi(\vec{r}+\vec{R})$$
for pairs of points on the surface separated by direct lattice vectors ##\vec{R}##.
(c) Show that the only information in the second of equations (11.38) not already contained in the first is in the equation:
$$(11.39)\hat{n}(\vec{r})\cdot \nabla \psi(\vec{r})=-e^{-i\vec{k}\cdot \vec{R}}\hat{n}(\vec{r}+\vec{R})\cdot \nabla \psi(\vec{r}+\vec{R}),$$
where the vector ##\hat{n}## is normal to the surface of the cell.


2. Relevant equations


3. The attempt at a solution
I am quite overwhelmed by this question, and am not sure where to start.

I would appreciate some guidance as to how to solve this problem.

Thanks.
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Old Nov 14th 2018, 11:27 AM   #5
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There is only one question at the end of chapter 11 in Ashcroft_Mermin.
Does the title of the chapter (Other methods) give you a clue?
Which method would you choose? (did you understand Green's functions?)
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problem 11.1 from Ashcroft and Mermin.-ashcroft1.jpg   problem 11.1 from Ashcroft and Mermin.-ashcroft2.jpg  
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Old Nov 14th 2018, 11:39 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by studiot View Post
There is only one question at the end of chapter 11 in Ashcroft_Mermin.
Does the title of the chapter (Other methods) give you a clue?
Which method would you choose? (did you understand Green's functions?)
There are 3 questions, and I don't understand how to start answering question 1.
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