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-   -   By mixing 3 types of invisible electromagnetic waves, as they pass through a solid ob (http://physicshelpforum.com/advanced-optics/11836-mixing-3-types-invisible-electromagnetic-waves-they-pass-through-solid-ob.html)

noabsortion1 Apr 17th 2016 01:41 PM

By mixing 3 types of invisible electromagnetic waves, as they pass through a solid ob
 
-ject, could the waves raise the electron to a shell level that is the same as glass, so that light cannot be absorbed, to make the object translucent, or transparent.
Is it possible for any invisible EM waves, like radio waves, ultraviolet soft, or hard X- Rays, or gamma rays, to be combined with other types of EM waves to be able to move electrons in the carbon block, to a shell level that does not absorb visible light, like in glass.
So you mix invisible EM waves of different wavelengths, and frequencies together.
This invisible electromagnetic wave technique by combining the waves has to be just right, in order to raise the electron to the right shell level.
It has to be finely tuned to perfection, to have the right waves combined, the wavelength has to be right, and the frequency too.
Temperature could effect the way the electron absorbs also.
So you want the EM waves to pass through the block of carbon, while also the electrons absorb some of the invisible EM waves, so the electron moves to a shell level that does not absorb visible light.
So the mixed invisible EM waves are passing through the carbon, while some of the invisible EM waves are being absorbed, and moving the electrons to a shell level where they will not absorb visible light.
Like in glass.
Is the only way to get the answer to this question is from in a laser laboratory
Thank you for your help, anything helps even a few words.


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